Jerry Good with Amazon

On this week's Industrial Talk we're talking to Jerry Good, Regional Manager at Amazon about “Leading the way through innovation and technology”.  Get the answers to your “Supply Chain Innovation” questions along with Jerry's unique insight on the “How” on this Industrial Talk interview!

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PODCAST TRANSCRIPT:

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

amazon, package, equipment, 29th annual, product, site, fluke, industrial, magnets, basics, redundancy, conference, fulfillment center, maintenance, understand, technology, talk, data, facilities, performs

00:00

On this episode of industrial talk, we were on site at the 29th annual s MRP conference. And if you weren't there, you missed a lot. So put it on your calendar for the 30th annual SMRP conference. Well already be this year. And you know, we were talking about in this interview, we're talking about innovation, we're talking about the deployment of technology, when it impacts supply chain from one of the leading companies in the world. Let's get cracking.

00:33

Welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So put on your hardhat, grab your work boots, and let's go

00:51

right welcome to industrial talk. Thank you very much for joining the number one industrial related podcasts in the universe. And I don't think I'm overselling that one bit. We are once again broadcasting from the 29th annual SMRP conference. We're trying to get our, I guess world back in order. And this is sort of a collection of the best maintenance and reliability professionals around the world. It is that important. And it's a great venue here in St. Louis. And we get to talk to some of the best that I mean, I'm just it's, it's, I'm all giddy because of it. That's what it's all about. And, and we couldn't make this happen. If it wasn't for Accruent. And Fluke Reliability. You got to go out to Accruent. I'm looking at their website right now. And it says solutions, real estate facilities and asset management. It's right there. I'm looking at it right now, gaining insights to transform how your organization manages its physical resources. You can't argue with that. And then of course, I go out to fluke, and you know, the color Fluke has got the big app there. And it's got that classic, gold yellow fluke, and this is what's interesting. You go out there, they break down the barriers between data systems, data systems, and teams by aggregating everything into one place. Yeah, that's dead sexy. I'm all into it. Absolutely. Wonderful. Okay, we're gonna be talking to Amazon. We're gonna be talking with a gentleman by the name of Jeremy. Good, and he is good. But you never heard that before. No,

02:19

never great. Only good.

02:23

Jeremy spectacular. All right, Jeremy. Welcome. How you doing, man?

02:29

Good, good.

02:31

Well, I like that. I like that. Good. Good. All right, double. So anyway, you're here, in at the conference, give us a little background on who you are, and why you're such an incredible professional. And then we're going to venture into what you talked about here at this conference. All right.

02:45

Well, I've got a lot of years of experience. I started off with Chrysler. Actually Chrysler back then,

02:55

I was gonna say in the new saw the acquisition of Fiat, right.

02:59

I saw lots of acquisitions, the merger of equals with Daimler. Oh, yeah. And then then we went to Chrysler Group and then a private equity had us for a little bit we almost went bankrupt. I remember that merger with fiyat. And now the merger with KSA with Atlantis. A lot of and I know after a while we were doing the merger was still Lanta so

03:21

it was funny, because there's just a lot of drama there. Remember that? It was just like, oh, another thing? Oh, another challenge? Oh, yes. Yeah,

03:28

Yeah. Look it. And we had good products. I mean, Jeep Dodge.

03:33

Oh, yeah. No, nobody's gonna debate that. I mean, it was just a lot of drama going on over there was, but look at you. You got a smile on your face. You. You survived. That's right now you're with Amazon.

03:42

Now I am. What do you do? So I am a maintenance Summit, regional manager for maintenance and reliability. So I have a the southwest region right now. And this week, it's gonna be announced that I get a little bit broader responsibility. When I'll have a third of North America for the large fulfillment, the ARS the Yeah, Amazon robotics centers near the large fulfillment.

04:11

Yeah, he's doing robotics. And of course, that's, that's cool, right?

04:16

Well imagine a site with eight to 10,000 robots. And really, yeah, that moves anywhere from 600,000 up to a little over a million packages per day.

04:28

And all the facilities are one facet. What and each one of those is that the type of commerce that is taking place? It's amazing. It's a hell of a stat.

04:37

Yes, it is. And so you think of cell towers is very similar to that. So you as a customer, so their goal is to give you a package in two hours or less. That's where we want to be okay. And in order to do that, you have multiple fulfillment centers strategically located To where if one site is down, another one can then do the fulfillment for that package, roughly.

05:06

And again, you're throwing out a lot of stuff here. But you're saying two hours, two hours or less that I'm on, I'm on your side, I order a home, you know, whatever widget, right? Whatever it might be. When that that process starts, you're trying to fulfill it in, in and in two hours.

05:27

Correct. So if you when you push that button, within the first 12 hours, say within the first five minutes, Amazon already knows what fulfillment center is the least expensive for them to bring that package to you. within that time frame that you have, if you have Amazon Prime, if you're on the coast right now, there, I think there are six sites that can guarantee within six hours of when you order, the little trivia see is the fastest is 12 minutes. From the time somebody pushed the button and was delivered,

06:05

you know, you understand the problem here. You guys are establishing a an expectation. And you're constantly pushing that from, from a consumer perspective, I have an expectation that I'm going to get that product. And I'm going to get that product relatively quick. And I'm not going to wait. And and that is a heck of an expectation. And I think you're disrupting logistics as a whole.

06:35

It's not a bad thing that's meeting the customers.

06:39

And I'm telling you, I love it. Don't get me wrong, man. I'm I'm all big into. Yeah, I need that. I need that. And you make it easy. That's right, you make it easy to get that widget, I don't have to sit there and struggle to find a widget that's there I go there Heck of a business model.

06:57

And that's because we're focused on the customer.

07:02

Yeah, no, no, note that because that is a very important component associated with any business, right? It is, you got it, you gotta focus on the customer, don't focus on yourself, provide what the customer needs solution, right? Solve that problem. Right? Now, all of a sudden, you're just screwing up everything just because my expectations are off through the roof. Now, let's talk a little bit about why you're here the SMRP. Tell us a little bit about the topic that you were discussing, so that you can share with the individuals.

07:29

Yeah, so we talked about challenging the norms. So we have so much technology now that we're losing sight of some of the basics. And without the basics to build upon. The technology starts to unravel.

07:48

Okay, you're gonna have to expand, what are the basics,

07:51

so the basics being knowing and understanding your equipment, seeing how it's the essentials, what we call within Amazon, essential skills, crafts. So knowing that how a bearing performs, knowing what the wear characteristics of different components of, of the equipment, how a motor runs, how, how the equipment at a, at a basic level, whether it's rollers, whether it's pulley shafts, gear ratios, whether it's a gearbox, how those things all work together, and no, no, that not have data just being fed to you saying, hey, the problems over here, and you need to go fix it. If you don't understand the why behind it, then when things change, you end up getting into more more problems. And we're talking about letting, letting software now software and technology have its place, there are tools, but there are tools that need to be grown upon, off of the basics and off of knowing and understanding those basics

09:03

is a part of the basics. The the human element. I mean,

09:10

I mean it is it is and it's it's so probably one of the best tools that break things down to the basic is a filmmaker failure mode with the criticality on how you how you do the maintenance to maintain that the empowerment, so but it is it there there the skills of of what the individual has, when you walk by a motor and you it's using your senses, smell, hearing, even taste is one of the senses. So how is that piece of equipment performing? And I'll tell you one of the examples when you look at a good site to a great site, so you want to go to something where you're running 99% 99.9999% uptime yeah The sites that are different, and that differentiate them are the ones that have those skill sets and do things like critical walks, where they're walking through the critical piece of equipment and seeing the different components and where they're at. And from a health standpoint, and then doing things proactively before they fail.

10:22

Yeah, because yeah, it does. Because your obligation, your fundamental driver is fulfilling that order in two hours or less. That's it correct. And that does not leave room for any, you know, reactive situation where something was breaking broke down, right?

10:38

Correct. On critical equipment there is there are redundancies built in sites.

10:43

If you notice my note down here, I get a little word that says redundancy and might not spell it right. But it does say redundancy, I was gonna ask that question. So when you start talking about critical critical equipment, do you from a criticality perspective? Do you create a redundancy? inventory that looks like you're here? No.

11:02

So Amazon does not build whip in different areas work in process or inventory, right? To help cushion that that those are ways? So right,

11:14

right? Because they are, don't get me wrong. I

11:16

mean, and when you're moving that much product, you've got to look at the equipment and say, okay, the things that are critical to our operation, need to be well known and understood. And the maintenance plan for that, including a lot of machine learning. And a lot of data points are average, I mean, we're five to 10,000 data points in one site coming in feeding information to us on the health of that piece of equipment and how it's performing. And are there other things that we need to be looking at from it, whether it's heat vibration,

11:52

so that's a that's a Iot, right? That's an IoT solution, data collection going someplace. And then there's this the analytics behind that that says, hey, this is just garbage. This is noisy data and noisy data, whatever data you don't worry about that data. But here in this little swim lane here, these this is the these are the data's that that data's is can I say data's there's a gentleman out there that I know real well, and he's a good guy. And I'm sorry, because we're alive. I see how No, don't even don't point way does take time. Anyway. So yeah, and then if you're saying, hey, something's out of parameter or whatever, in this, whatever, analytics, this algorithm, then it notifies

12:40

and notifies and let you know that there's something wrong. Yeah. The thing is, you have to go back and look at the why behind it. Because if you do act on that, and you don't see a result, or you don't see an effect of that, and you need to understand the why behind it.

12:57

But why have the failure? The why of the problem? Why? What would like what, what's that? Why?

13:01

Yes, it is, it's, it's all inclusive, right? You want to know why it failed. So so because

13:09

you don't use for example, with just pencil whipping and then and then just sort of sit there and, and, okay, it's fixed now, but you never understood the why. And it could happen again,

13:17

well, we understand we know enough of the equipment, and how it performs. That it's not the exception, it's not the normal things for the equipment that that catches us off guard. It's the human intervention beforehand, bringing product in that, for example, a bunch of magnets, and they break loose, because they're not box properly. And I got magnets on a conveyor that's going 400 feet per minute, or feet per second. And with diverters, and all kinds of stuff on it, and it just doesn't perform because it's got magnets stuck everywhere. So it's those things like that, that create the, the event that you need to understand. Okay, so now, we need to package this differently. We need to do this differently to make sure that it doesn't happen again.

14:09

Walk us through that process. So you sit there and you clearly you're you're trying to understand the why. Fantastic, that's really important. Where does that go? I mean, that's, that's a human conversation. So

14:22

that goes back into the systems on the inputs. So and we have, there's a term that they use on a product description that shows this product can be packaged only this way, this way or this way. And it needs to be have this much density around it or whatever to protect, really, and then it goes through. So you may not realize there's a lot of those things from the lessons learned. So, we know we have this failure. So now the product cannot be packaged this way the way it was that it failed. Now it can only be package this way and this way.

15:02

So let's say let's say on packaging, I'm the packaging person I'm trying to fulfill this order, then it comes, it comes in on a screen, right? And and I look at and it's magnets will just keep on running with that analogy. So it's magnets. And then I get from from, from whatever interface direction on

15:23

only package in this box, but this material packing material with this tape, and I mean, it lights up for them. So that tells you intuitively exactly what you do and what sequence and

15:37

so so what if it's a new product, whether it's like, okay, Amazon, your process a lot, don't get me wrong, I don't know, if you've, it's like trying to find a domain name. Does it even exist out there? Like all domain names? It? What if it's a new product? So then

15:54

it's tested? In different variations on Bob, really everything else? Yeah, there are some standards that it'll come in at just because of package, right. And there's less expensive packaging, to more expensive packaging as well. So you start with the less expensive, try to make it as reliable as you can, and you work your way up to the more expensive if you need it. So there is a there is a method and a science to everything.

16:22

Yeah, a guy that likes process. Me, I love that I always I was always process something out. This is exciting and giddy. For me. I just think it's, it's the coolest thing since sliced bread. Eventually, I would imagine that Amazon's gonna have put a some sort of monitor in my head. And I don't even have to go to the website. I could just sort of say, I need potato chips. And there it is. And it's like, Oh, it's right there.

16:50

Yeah, we look at your buying habits. So we can have it show up exactly when you do it. But he chips every Sunday afternoon.

16:59

But you do. Yeah. Yeah. Because I do. Yes. And it's it's very effective. Very, very effective. I didn't know I needed those things. But at that particular time, I did. And thank goodness that was right there for me to Yeah. Hey, consider these. Yes. All right. The the last final question I have is where do you see all this going? I mean, that's pretty doggone you're, you're constantly. I mean, every day, every day, every day, you're you're making it more efficient. You're always trying to figure out more better, faster, the Steve Austin approach, right? Where do you see it going? I mean, is there a point of diminishing returns? Or is just sort of That's it. That's life. Well, Amazon's

17:47

extremely innovative. So you will see new markets being developed. So right now we're delivering packages. Pretty soon it's going to be delivering food, fresh food. It could be technology in the home. I mean, it's gonna go go go.

18:14

For somebody that's just founded on impatience. That's me. I am impatient. Amazon is absolutely. Yeah, it's for me. Oh, my gosh, I'm so glad that you. I mean, this is a this is a great conversation. It's pretty cool. Yeah, I didn't mean it. I just I had there's so much more I, I want on my bucket list. I want to just tour one of those facilities just to say it. Absolutely. Look at I know somebody. That's right. And as I stare at you, creepy, but stare at you, nonetheless. How do people get a hold of you? They're saying, Hey, I like what he's talking about. Jeremy is a great guy. He's good. But he's really fantastic. How do I get ahold of

18:54

my email is probably the best good jr@amazon.com All right.

18:59

Once again, I just want to say thank you very much for being on the industrial talk podcast because you were absolutely wonderful. All right, listeners. We're broadcasting from the 29th annual SMRP conference here in St. Louis. It's fantastic. It's got a collection of the best maintenance reliability professionals known to man or woman or people, whatever. And we're brought to you by Accruent and Fluke Reliability, you got to go out to their website because their specialty, they've got great people, great solutions, great company, so don't hesitate. And then finally, just finally, you're saying I gotta get a hold Jeremy. Fear not. We're gonna wrap it up on the OSI, all the contact information that you need to be aware of. So stay tuned. And thank you very much for joining industrial talk.

19:44

You're listening to the industrial talk Podcast Network.

19:54

All right. That is Jeremy. Good. He goes by Jerry. I didn't mention it in the interview. Why? We're at the 29th annual SMRP conference. But you could call him Jerry. I have his email address out and industrial talk.com. They're doing fantastic things as you could tell by the interview, that they're doing incredible things at Amazon big time. It's an exciting time. Now. As we wrap up, I'm reminded of a quote that I just recently heard again, confused minds say, No, don't be confused. We've got to in this in this industrial age, this this innovation industry for Dotto, we've got to educate. That means we've got to do everything we can to consume that content. Because we depend on you each and every day. Because you're bold, brave you dare greatly Jerry is and many of the great people who have been on industrial talk are all bold, brave and daring greatly. Let's change the world industries changing the world because you guys are our people. So another great interview right around the corner so stay tuned.

Transcript

00:00

On this episode of industrial talk, we were on site at the 29th annual s MRP conference. And if you weren't there, you missed a lot. So put it on your calendar for the 30th annual SMRP conference. Well already be this year. And you know, we were talking about in this interview, we're talking about innovation, we're talking about the deployment of technology, when it impacts supply chain from one of the leading companies in the world. Let's get cracking.

00:33

Welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So put on your hardhat, grab your work boots, and let's go

00:51

right welcome to industrial talk. Thank you very much for joining the number one industrial related podcasts in the universe. And I don't think I'm overselling that one bit. We are once again broadcasting from the 29th annual SMRP conference. We're trying to get our, I guess world back in order. And this is sort of a collection of the best maintenance and reliability professionals around the world. It is that important. And it's a great venue here in St. Louis. And we get to talk to some of the best that I mean, I'm just it's, it's, I'm all giddy because of it. That's what it's all about. And, and we couldn't make this happen. If it wasn't for Accruent. And Fluke Reliability. You got to go out to Accruent. I'm looking at their website right now. And it says solutions, real estate facilities and asset management. It's right there. I'm looking at it right now, gaining insights to transform how your organization manages its physical resources. You can't argue with that. And then of course, I go out to fluke, and you know, the color Fluke has got the big app there. And it's got that classic, gold yellow fluke, and this is what's interesting. You go out there, they break down the barriers between data systems, data systems, and teams by aggregating everything into one place. Yeah, that's dead sexy. I'm all into it. Absolutely. Wonderful. Okay, we're gonna be talking to Amazon. We're gonna be talking with a gentleman by the name of Jeremy. Good, and he is good. But you never heard that before. No,

02:19

never great. Only good.

02:23

Jeremy spectacular. All right, Jeremy. Welcome. How you doing, man?

02:29

Good, good.

02:31

Well, I like that. I like that. Good. Good. All right, double. So anyway, you're here, in at the conference, give us a little background on who you are, and why you're such an incredible professional. And then we're going to venture into what you talked about here at this conference. All right.

02:45

Well, I've got a lot of years of experience. I started off with Chrysler. Actually Chrysler back then,

02:55

I was gonna say in the new saw the acquisition of Fiat, right.

02:59

I saw lots of acquisitions, the merger of equals with Daimler. Oh, yeah. And then then we went to Chrysler Group and then a private equity had us for a little bit we almost went bankrupt. I remember that merger with fiyat. And now the merger with KSA with Atlantis. A lot of and I know after a while we were doing the merger was still Lanta so

03:21

it was funny, because there's just a lot of drama there. Remember that? It was just like, oh, another thing? Oh, another challenge? Oh, yes. Yeah,

03:28

Yeah. Look it. And we had good products. I mean, Jeep Dodge.

03:33

Oh, yeah. No, nobody's gonna debate that. I mean, it was just a lot of drama going on over there was, but look at you. You got a smile on your face. You. You survived. That's right now you're with Amazon.

03:42

Now I am. What do you do? So I am a maintenance Summit, regional manager for maintenance and reliability. So I have a the southwest region right now. And this week, it's gonna be announced that I get a little bit broader responsibility. When I'll have a third of North America for the large fulfillment, the ARS the Yeah, Amazon robotics centers near the large fulfillment.

04:11

Yeah, he's doing robotics. And of course, that's, that's cool, right?

04:16

Well imagine a site with eight to 10,000 robots. And really, yeah, that moves anywhere from 600,000 up to a little over a million packages per day.

04:28

And all the facilities are one facet. What and each one of those is that the type of commerce that is taking place? It's amazing. It's a hell of a stat.

04:37

Yes, it is. And so you think of cell towers is very similar to that. So you as a customer, so their goal is to give you a package in two hours or less. That's where we want to be okay. And in order to do that, you have multiple fulfillment centers strategically located To where if one site is down, another one can then do the fulfillment for that package, roughly.

05:06

And again, you're throwing out a lot of stuff here. But you're saying two hours, two hours or less that I'm on, I'm on your side, I order a home, you know, whatever widget, right? Whatever it might be. When that that process starts, you're trying to fulfill it in, in and in two hours.

05:27

Correct. So if you when you push that button, within the first 12 hours, say within the first five minutes, Amazon already knows what fulfillment center is the least expensive for them to bring that package to you. within that time frame that you have, if you have Amazon Prime, if you're on the coast right now, there, I think there are six sites that can guarantee within six hours of when you order, the little trivia see is the fastest is 12 minutes. From the time somebody pushed the button and was delivered,

06:05

you know, you understand the problem here. You guys are establishing a an expectation. And you're constantly pushing that from, from a consumer perspective, I have an expectation that I'm going to get that product. And I'm going to get that product relatively quick. And I'm not going to wait. And and that is a heck of an expectation. And I think you're disrupting logistics as a whole.

06:35

It's not a bad thing that's meeting the customers.

06:39

And I'm telling you, I love it. Don't get me wrong, man. I'm I'm all big into. Yeah, I need that. I need that. And you make it easy. That's right, you make it easy to get that widget, I don't have to sit there and struggle to find a widget that's there I go there Heck of a business model.

06:57

And that's because we're focused on the customer.

07:02

Yeah, no, no, note that because that is a very important component associated with any business, right? It is, you got it, you gotta focus on the customer, don't focus on yourself, provide what the customer needs solution, right? Solve that problem. Right? Now, all of a sudden, you're just screwing up everything just because my expectations are off through the roof. Now, let's talk a little bit about why you're here the SMRP. Tell us a little bit about the topic that you were discussing, so that you can share with the individuals.

07:29

Yeah, so we talked about challenging the norms. So we have so much technology now that we're losing sight of some of the basics. And without the basics to build upon. The technology starts to unravel.

07:48

Okay, you're gonna have to expand, what are the basics,

07:51

so the basics being knowing and understanding your equipment, seeing how it's the essentials, what we call within Amazon, essential skills, crafts. So knowing that how a bearing performs, knowing what the wear characteristics of different components of, of the equipment, how a motor runs, how, how the equipment at a, at a basic level, whether it's rollers, whether it's pulley shafts, gear ratios, whether it's a gearbox, how those things all work together, and no, no, that not have data just being fed to you saying, hey, the problems over here, and you need to go fix it. If you don't understand the why behind it, then when things change, you end up getting into more more problems. And we're talking about letting, letting software now software and technology have its place, there are tools, but there are tools that need to be grown upon, off of the basics and off of knowing and understanding those basics

09:03

is a part of the basics. The the human element. I mean,

09:10

.:

10:22

Yeah, because yeah, it does. Because your obligation, your fundamental driver is fulfilling that order in two hours or less. That's it correct. And that does not leave room for any, you know, reactive situation where something was breaking broke down, right?

10:38

Correct. On critical equipment there is there are redundancies built in sites.

10:43

If you notice my note down here, I get a little word that says redundancy and might not spell it right. But it does say redundancy, I was gonna ask that question. So when you start talking about critical critical equipment, do you from a criticality perspective? Do you create a redundancy? inventory that looks like you're here? No.

11:02

So Amazon does not build whip in different areas work in process or inventory, right? To help cushion that that those are ways? So right,

11:14

right? Because they are, don't get me wrong. I

11:16

mean, and when you're moving that much product, you've got to look at the equipment and say, okay, the things that are critical to our operation, need to be well known and understood. And the maintenance plan for that, including a lot of machine learning. And a lot of data points are average, I mean, we're five to 10,000 data points in one site coming in feeding information to us on the health of that piece of equipment and how it's performing. And are there other things that we need to be looking at from it, whether it's heat vibration,

11:52

so that's a that's a Iot, right? That's an IoT solution, data collection going someplace. And then there's this the analytics behind that that says, hey, this is just garbage. This is noisy data and noisy data, whatever data you don't worry about that data. But here in this little swim lane here, these this is the these are the data's that that data's is can I say data's there's a gentleman out there that I know real well, and he's a good guy. And I'm sorry, because we're alive. I see how No, don't even don't point way does take time. Anyway. So yeah, and then if you're saying, hey, something's out of parameter or whatever, in this, whatever, analytics, this algorithm, then it notifies

12:40

and notifies and let you know that there's something wrong. Yeah. The thing is, you have to go back and look at the why behind it. Because if you do act on that, and you don't see a result, or you don't see an effect of that, and you need to understand the why behind it.

12:57

But why have the failure? The why of the problem? Why? What would like what, what's that? Why?

13:01

Yes, it is, it's, it's all inclusive, right? You want to know why it failed. So so because

13:09

you don't use for example, with just pencil whipping and then and then just sort of sit there and, and, okay, it's fixed now, but you never understood the why. And it could happen again,

13:17

well, we understand we know enough of the equipment, and how it performs. That it's not the exception, it's not the normal things for the equipment that that catches us off guard. It's the human intervention beforehand, bringing product in that, for example, a bunch of magnets, and they break loose, because they're not box properly. And I got magnets on a conveyor that's going 400 feet per minute, or feet per second. And with diverters, and all kinds of stuff on it, and it just doesn't perform because it's got magnets stuck everywhere. So it's those things like that, that create the, the event that you need to understand. Okay, so now, we need to package this differently. We need to do this differently to make sure that it doesn't happen again.

14:09

Walk us through that process. So you sit there and you clearly you're you're trying to understand the why. Fantastic, that's really important. Where does that go? I mean, that's, that's a human conversation. So

14:22

that goes back into the systems on the inputs. So and we have, there's a term that they use on a product description that shows this product can be packaged only this way, this way or this way. And it needs to be have this much density around it or whatever to protect, really, and then it goes through. So you may not realize there's a lot of those things from the lessons learned. So, we know we have this failure. So now the product cannot be packaged this way the way it was that it failed. Now it can only be package this way and this way.

15:02

So let's say let's say on packaging, I'm the packaging person I'm trying to fulfill this order, then it comes, it comes in on a screen, right? And and I look at and it's magnets will just keep on running with that analogy. So it's magnets. And then I get from from, from whatever interface direction on

15:23

only package in this box, but this material packing material with this tape, and I mean, it lights up for them. So that tells you intuitively exactly what you do and what sequence and

15:37

so so what if it's a new product, whether it's like, okay, Amazon, your process a lot, don't get me wrong, I don't know, if you've, it's like trying to find a domain name. Does it even exist out there? Like all domain names? It? What if it's a new product? So then

15:54

it's tested? In different variations on Bob, really everything else? Yeah, there are some standards that it'll come in at just because of package, right. And there's less expensive packaging, to more expensive packaging as well. So you start with the less expensive, try to make it as reliable as you can, and you work your way up to the more expensive if you need it. So there is a there is a method and a science to everything.

16:22

Yeah, a guy that likes process. Me, I love that I always I was always process something out. This is exciting and giddy. For me. I just think it's, it's the coolest thing since sliced bread. Eventually, I would imagine that Amazon's gonna have put a some sort of monitor in my head. And I don't even have to go to the website. I could just sort of say, I need potato chips. And there it is. And it's like, Oh, it's right there.

16:50

Yeah, we look at your buying habits. So we can have it show up exactly when you do it. But he chips every Sunday afternoon.

16:59

But you do. Yeah. Yeah. Because I do. Yes. And it's it's very effective. Very, very effective. I didn't know I needed those things. But at that particular time, I did. And thank goodness that was right there for me to Yeah. Hey, consider these. Yes. All right. The the last final question I have is where do you see all this going? I mean, that's pretty doggone you're, you're constantly. I mean, every day, every day, every day, you're you're making it more efficient. You're always trying to figure out more better, faster, the Steve Austin approach, right? Where do you see it going? I mean, is there a point of diminishing returns? Or is just sort of That's it. That's life. Well, Amazon's

17:47

extremely innovative. So you will see new markets being developed. So right now we're delivering packages. Pretty soon it's going to be delivering food, fresh food. It could be technology in the home. I mean, it's gonna go go go.

18:14

For somebody that's just founded on impatience. That's me. I am impatient. Amazon is absolutely. Yeah, it's for me. Oh, my gosh, I'm so glad that you. I mean, this is a this is a great conversation. It's pretty cool. Yeah, I didn't mean it. I just I had there's so much more I, I want on my bucket list. I want to just tour one of those facilities just to say it. Absolutely. Look at I know somebody. That's right. And as I stare at you, creepy, but stare at you, nonetheless. How do people get a hold of you? They're saying, Hey, I like what he's talking about. Jeremy is a great guy. He's good. But he's really fantastic. How do I get ahold of

18:54

my email is probably the best good jr@amazon.com All right.

18:59

Once again, I just want to say thank you very much for being on the industrial talk podcast because you were absolutely wonderful. All right, listeners. We're broadcasting from the 29th annual SMRP conference here in St. Louis. It's fantastic. It's got a collection of the best maintenance reliability professionals known to man or woman or people, whatever. And we're brought to you by Accruent and Fluke Reliability, you got to go out to their website because their specialty, they've got great people, great solutions, great company, so don't hesitate. And then finally, just finally, you're saying I gotta get a hold Jeremy. Fear not. We're gonna wrap it up on the OSI, all the contact information that you need to be aware of. So stay tuned. And thank you very much for joining industrial talk.

19:44

You're listening to the industrial talk Podcast Network.

19:54

All right. That is Jeremy. Good. He goes by Jerry. I didn't mention it in the interview. Why? We're at the 29th annual SMRP conference. But you could call him Jerry. I have his email address out and industrial talk.com. They're doing fantastic things as you could tell by the interview, that they're doing incredible things at Amazon big time. It's an exciting time. Now. As we wrap up, I'm reminded of a quote that I just recently heard again, confused minds say, No, don't be confused. We've got to in this in this industrial age, this this innovation industry for Dotto, we've got to educate. That means we've got to do everything we can to consume that content. Because we depend on you each and every day. Because you're bold, brave you dare greatly Jerry is and many of the great people who have been on industrial talk are all bold, brave and daring greatly. Let's change the world industries changing the world because you guys are our people. So another great interview right around the corner so stay tuned.

About the author, Scott

I am Scott MacKenzie, husband, father, and passionate industry educator. From humble beginnings as a lathing contractor and certified journeyman/lineman to an Undergraduate and Master’s Degree in Business Administration, I have applied every aspect of my education and training to lead and influence. I believe in serving and adding value wherever I am called.

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