Nathaniel Dick and Eduardo Venegas with North Carolina Econ Dev

On this week's Industrial Talk we're onsite at FABTECH in Atlanta, GA and talking to Eduardo Venegas, Manager of Business Recruitment at Charlotte Regional Business Alliance and Nathaniel Dick, Business Development Manager with the Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina (EDPNC) about “Partnerships and collaboration in your  Economic Development efforts”. Get the answers to your “Business Development” questions along with Nathaniel and Eduardo's unique insight on the “How” on this Industrial Talk interview!

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NATHANIEL DICK'S CONTACT INFORMATION:

Personal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nathaniel-dick-92794612/

Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/edpnc/

Company Website: https://edpnc.com/

EDUARDO VENEGAS' CONTACT INFORMATION:

Personal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eduardojvenegas/

Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/charlotte-regional-business-alliance/

Company Website: https://charlotteregion.com/

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PODCAST TRANSCRIPT:

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

north carolina, people, state, region, industry, companies, eduardo, business, workforce, economic development, nathaniel, programs, conversation, charlotte, industrial, technical colleges, manufacturers, set, world, moving

00:04

Welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So put on your hard hat, grab your work boots, and let's get our I

00:22

once again, thank you very much for joining the industrial talk. And thank you so much for your support, we as you can tell, there's chirping chirping going in the background, and we are broadcasting on site. FABTECH is the location. It is in Atlanta, Georgia. And and I gotta tell you, it is exciting. There's a lot of people roaming around. And once again, you know that this platform is dedicated to you, industry professionals all around the world, because you are bold, you are brave, you dare greatly, and you're making the world a better place. That's why this platform celebrates you each and every day. All right, in the hot seat, we have to a twofer. The manual, and Eduardo are in the house. And we're gonna be talking a little bit about whatever they want to talk about. But primarily economic development. Let's get cracking. You don't have to talk about that. If you don't want it.

01:12

It's important. We would love to talk about economics. Yeah, so let's make

01:17

it happen. Before we get into that conversation, let's level set for the listeners out there. Nathaniel to give us a little background of what makes you so passionate about what you do. How did you become a, you know this professionally? Your next, FYI. Right?

01:33

Yeah, of course. And so my background was engineering. I actually graduated I was born and raised in North Carolina, currently working in Gothenburg in North Carolina. After I graduate from university, I went abroad, sort of what university NC State Of course, engineering how ridiculous currently the third largest engineering school in the US just to add that to here's a plug, there you go. There you go. The also the number 17. I'll stop there, but I was. I went abroad for a while doing wastewater treatment, Brian will say surrounding industries helped set up companies and projects overseas. Really, really enjoyed that. And realize there's another aspect of making projects that setup process a whole lot easier. So they came back to North Carolina. Fortunately, North Carolina offers economic development in a partnership. So one of 17 states that use a partnership instead of a using the only the will say the Department of Commerce office or the governor's office, we're actually a public private partnership. So it gives a little bit more flexibility and the ability to actually travel, meet with companies personally and say, Hey, listen, this is how we can integrate your company into a particular region. This is what makes sense for your company. So it really attracted me to the area, or to the industry, per se. And I've been enjoying it ever since. Obviously, with the kind of development you work with all sorts of industries. Be here. FABTECH is great. This is one of my passions, but really is the that general being able to continue to learn, and then also assist companies as I once was on the other side of the spectrum, and really experienced that from this side. It's a hard act to follow. I'm sorry, Eduardo. I'm learning as I go. It's good. Give us a little background.

03:17

Yes. So I'm originally from Costa Rica. But I moved to the US 10 years ago, actually to the shadow region, for my MBA, and I started working with a small business development center, helping intrapreneurs in their communities, just helping them grow, and really in the whole region. And I did that for around eight years was was really rewarding. And up to this day, sometimes I drive down the road and say, like, help that business. And then after that I worked for a technical college or community college as a program manager for Business and Professional Development in workforce and economic development. We help them with customized training, all everything from real estate to leadership. You name it, you know, I managed those programs, before joining the Charlotte Regional Business Alliance, which now I'm in business recruitment, which for the RIT for the Charlotte region, which includes, you know, 10 states in North Carolina, and for in South 10

04:23

counties tend to collaborate because work together. Yes, very much. So. A couple of questions, one, explain. Partnership. What does that mean? You say, Hey, we're, we're this is sort of a economic development arm, but we are in sort of that partnership. And what does that mean? That's different from others?

04:45

Yeah, of course. Well, I mean, there's no real will say perfect way to do economic development. A lot of states do it through the Department of Commerce, and that's great, and they have a lot of success dealing with that. A lot of times with government there tends to be an addition of red tape to As to maybe some bureaucracy, there also tends to be the very difficult to adapt to certain situations, I'll be at turnover setting KPI, even smaller instances, being a state employee, you have a prospect that comes into town and you take him to view a couple of sites, you want to buy him some alcohol, you can't do that. So your your hands are tied in certain areas, there's that doesn't quite have that flexibility. Being a public private partnership means you get that additional flexibility, you can be a little bit more adapting to the environment. And you can see how the industry changes and adapt to that adapt your workforce, adapt how you target and market. And of course, even the smaller things perhaps like employee turnover, setting higher KPIs, purchasing alcohol has made the wood much more accessible. Um, so currently, several states are will say using this model, as opposed to the traditional only to Department of Commerce to the governor's office model, do economic development. North Carolina has had some success doing this. And we're ranked number one by CNBC for the number one state to do business this past year. So building up that success, I would say the partnership model has been very good for us. It may not may or may not be the answer for every state. But from North Carolina, I believe it's been a very good read thus far.

06:13

You touched on upon a lot of points. Now, Eduardo, I want to sort of pull on the string of resource development, there's a churn and and how do you how do you sort of pull this economic development with all of the changes that are taking place within just the workforce workforce development coming and going? And how do you manage that?

06:37

Well, certainly, it's challenging, because like you said, it's constantly moving, it's constantly changing. But part of that is organization like the one that I work for, we try to coordinate those efforts, making sure that everyone understands, you know, what type of industries are coming into the region, what type of jobs are going to be needed in the next five or 10 years working with those universities, like I said, so they can build the programs that they need. So the companies can have the pipeline that we'll need eventually.

07:09

So in that case, you're working with just education to say, hey, we're working to get these type this type of business into our states. And we'll need this type of workforce. So let's work with you universities, college, technical colleges, and be able to create that workforce of that can satisfy that demand. Because that's a big part of what you guys do. Because it's one thing to say, Come on over, come on over business. But then if you don't have the workforce to help them

07:47

it's got you really hit on the head there. 100% very much, though, a very different outreach, maybe four or five years ago to get common development. You got there and you'd, you'd sell the the taxes. So incent proposals. Now, it's do you have people, what is the quality of life? Will I be able to attract people in the future? So if you you saw our booth earlier in the back of our booth, how much industry do you see? You saw rivers, you saw doughnuts? You saw a nice quality of life. It's a little interesting. Yeah.

08:16

It was funny because I'm trying to put it together. God. There's a donor. Tracking. This is the best place for donut manufacturer.

08:27

It's got you know the answer to that, right? It's Yes. The home of Krispy Kreme western North Carolina. Yes. So the revolution picture. There you go. Yeah, that workhorse? Yes. Bringing people No, no, no, it's good.

08:43

We saw an old Krispy Kreme sign. It was like that retro. It was okay. It was like, Oh, that's pretty cool. Okay, yeah, I digress. And aggressive. So how do you do that, Eduardo, how do we? How do we ensure you're, you're, you're buzzing around and? And how do you just ensure that these businesses feel comfortable knowing that we're going to the right place to be successful? We have that great partnership. And I know that we're stepping forward with our best football. How do we do that?

09:18

So I think is a lot of collaboration, making sure that all the partners are in sync. They know they know what it's coming, getting them on the table early in that conversation, so that everyone kind of speak the same language and in when companies come into market, helping them making you know, setting up meetings with the technical colleges or with other employers that are already there that you can tell the story and say hey, you we are already in Charlo. We are in this region. We have been here for this long lead. You know what better than having the another company speak the wrong story about how they have been successful and how maybe another one can do the same, you know, in just help grow that ecosystem that it's already been in place.

10:07

So let me put my hat on. And I, again, technology, blistering, the pace is absolutely blistering. So whatever I know today, tomorrow, I'm sure I'm on version 27. And I'm still sort of evaluating version one. So that's a reality of the marketplace to, then there's certain interesting economic challenges out there that are not just impact, and it's like a manufacturing, whatever the product is, that we are so interred. I mean, it's just interrelated. And every part is so important. What do you see in this sort of put that future hat? And this is going to Nathaniel, what do you see? How do companies sort of deal with the volatility that like, I think I see. And what I hear, let's put it that way, I, God bless those people that are dealing with supply chain and sourcing and all of the other stuff that's associated with just fulfilling

11:10

work in reference to supply chain. I mean, I think that's really something that sort of hit everyone by surprise.

11:16

Whereas with a two by four, very much so.

11:20

And if you noticed, I mean, not in reference to North Carolina that just happened on the East Coast. I think everyone sit back and like, Well, wait a minute. Look what happened to Los Angeles, maybe we need to do something about our ports to Charleston, stretching airport, North Carolina's Jackson airport as well. I mean, there's a lot of money.

11:36

Yes, it dredging. Yeah, they're cleaning it out. They're getting there. Yeah. So So bring it better, larger vessels or whatever.

11:44

Exactly. Exactly. So for example, certain ports, and I mean, I don't want to bash anyone here, but certain ports now only there's only maybe during high tide, you can come in, you turn around and come out. So when it's low tide, that you're not accessible as they really limit your ability there. So it's like, well, you know, if we dredged it's a couple more feet, we can bring in those post Panama ships, we can get a full turn for our service, that that really expands the operations and capability in companies now they're looking for that.

12:12

Yeah, yeah, they are

12:13

very much. So lots going into the railroads, let's go into the actual I will say the road and transportation infrastructure as well. So very much so.

12:21

Have you had Eduardo conversations about more reshoring, onshoring, nearshoring, whatever shoring to bring critical manufacturers back, okay, I can manufacture I've got a portfolio of manufacturing capabilities. I can keep that manufacturing process down there. But I need I need these critical ones. Have you been having those conversations?

12:48

Yes, yes, we have. And I think with the pandemic, and now it's becoming even more important. And you know, like Natalia was saying, what the supply chain issues, a companies are saying, well, we cannot keep for operations on the other side of the world, when people need things like now and quickly. So we're starting to get more of those conversation with companies, the same pay, I think, is maybe the time to get closer to where or consumers are, you know, the US is where they sell most of their products? Well, you know, we've COVID clearly show some of the differences that supply chain has. So we're starting to have a lot of those conversations, there is a lot of interest from international companies to like Eastern Europe, like they're looking at the US too, as another place to set up some local corporations. Because again, you know, they want to make sure they're closer to where they are selling across.

13:44

So with your organization, it let's say I'm a manufacturer, and I got it, and I can I can just go knocking on the door and saying, Hey, this is what I'm thinking and the skill sets the the ability to be able to collaborate and say and get answers to get some insights, at least begin that journey. I can I could definitely reach out to you guys and be able to do that

14:06

right? Of course and please do.

14:10

So So what do you guys do to sort of help get that message out? To anybody?

14:15

And stuff like we're here today.

14:18

And we have a boosted up here on the industrial talk podcast, which happens to be the number one this is not this is all backed up by data. Number one industrial related podcast in the universe. It's bigger than the Galaxy.

14:30

Wow. It's an honor to be here. Yes. Yes. I mean, to ask you a question. This is probably it.

14:40

You will not know what's gonna hit it. Well, I had to be the witness to solve it. Yeah. No.

14:47

Dancer, your question I mean, it states use a variety of different I mean, we do we do the missions obviously we try to, for certain will say specific industries. We try to get officials involved. Obviously we try to make other companies is aware or other artists associations aware of maybe certain industrial benefits of a particular region, as opposed to other regions? A lot of it's just making, putting that information out there and letting people know there's really no hindrance or negative to reaching out to a state economic developer and say, Hey, listen, what would it look like if we did a facility there, a lot of states had a building, or had programs that deal with existing buildings have have programs that are dealing with new greenfield projects, hey, listen, it just so happens, we have this facility here, we can back it up with a certain level of support financially, for us certain trading programs for the local community college. And just to explore those options. I mean, there's no, no hands are being tied, and nothing's being signed. But just to know, hey, listen, these are my growth options in the future. And this is maybe how state a or region A can support me as opposed to reach A, B.

15:46

C, I love that. That's why I like the fact that I can come over and approach you and just have that conversation. I'm a big advocate of just constantly trying to educate, I don't have the answers. It's moving fast. I sense it out there. So it's really important to be able to at least know that I can go to you and it's like, Hey, I'm thinking about this and be able to have that sort of insights and guidance. I don't see anything wrong. any pushback on that? Oh, no,

16:15

not at all. That's why we are here for you. The specific guy represent the shadow region, but even in the North Carolina State, many people don't really know the great assets that the state has in the region has. And that's where our job is to help people realize that there is an opportunity here that they may not be part of what they have been thinking about. Because, you know, usually people are there other markets are well known in the US that even especially if you're thinking people outside of the US, but they know is Chicago and New York. Yeah.

16:50

The big markets are still California. Yeah. Nobody knows about that.

16:55

But but the Carolinas they don't necessarily know about it. So it's just educating them about it. So once they know about the, what do we have here? You can tell when they first come to Charlotte region is like, wow, I didn't realize that you have the fifth busiest airport of the world. It's already here.

17:17

Yeah. And all of a sudden, I'm getting have a layover in Charlotte. Like,

17:22

oh, yeah, happen. You're flying American. I see. Yeah.

17:30

No, no, that's, that's really interesting. Now, Nathaniel, is there. Are there any industries? What what is that general focus? You know, the say, Everybody come on here come on to North Carolina, or they're really sort of focused industry

17:45

in to be honest. And that's why it's a good idea to reach out to the economic developers. Hey, listen, this is this is my industry. Is this a good fit? Obviously, as a state income developer, I have to say every nurse is good fit North Carolina, right. In reality, maybe off the podcast, we have a more honest conversation, but not to be. I mean, obviously, there's certain areas in North Carolina, we tend to RSA on a regional basis, tend to handle a little bit better. The Southeast region for established tends to have a much higher percentage of GDP comes from traditional manufacturing in North Carolina that dates back to your traditional furniture, textile havens. Why and even now we're just sort of was a transferred or evolved into bio manufacturing, a lot of metal fabrication other manufacturers in the area. And so it just looking at, okay, well, we have these industries, but progress is North Carolina, what resources does this take that will come with put into these industries? So in North Carolina as a region, you'd find? All right, well, what we have we have large military bases, Fort Bragg largest military base, arguably in the world, about 20,000 kids leaving the bases every year when I say kids, maybe average 2020. Trained, why don't we put some resources into programs to connect these people are going to basis to manufacturers local, a good percentage of wanna stay local, anyways, their skills or discipline is a great workforce to tap on to so we could do that. So each state in the region is going to have their own strength. It may be tech, it may be general manufacturing might have application, but I mean, you can speak to state developers, Hey, these are the programs you have. We have on base this what you can tap into even if you're here, or you're thinking about being here, and this is where we can maybe improve your stay our business in Africa region.

19:24

I really like. I like that. Because if I was a business, I would definitely make sure that wherever I go, I know that there's that. That resource. That would be my driver. It's just skilled resources. I got it. There's a building. Yeah, you've got all of the main, you know, transportation stuff. I got it, but

19:44

it's so important now. Just everything 100% Very much so the live cast is published. They do the I wonder they call it the workforce. Talent scorecard, I believe, every year of which states just basically net properly Shouldn't gate net population loss? You could probably guess the states have the highest net population gain. Get your Florida up there of course, Texas, Arizona and stuff. North North Carolina. Yeah, of course

20:15

North Carolina was

20:17

your 567 on that list you have Tennessee of South Carolina of Georgia, just manufacturing Haven. So what we're seeing right now if you look at the the other other states on the other end of the spectrum is your New York and California stuff. We're seeing a lot of that tradition manufactured leaving from there, not necessarily going to North Carolina and please shop around but I mean going to Texas, going to Florida, go into Georgia, go into Tennessee, South Carolina, etc. Tends to be those areas that have those programs, more structure to manufacturers.

20:47

I do as we close out give me a parting shot. What make make your case of coming to North Carolina. Come on Eduardo. Do not not not. And then your next Nathaniel, you can't you can't plagiarize what he said, Oh, please.

21:07

Well, I will say that it's a great place to do business there is I really, I would say a big pool but there is a workforce that is available, man like Nathan has just said there's many people moving into the state every time just to the Charlotte region. 84 people a day are moving to Charlotte, in the average age of those people are 31 years. So if you can see that, you know, that's a good source. People can tap in and with that, too is North Carolina also provides the right lifestyle for those people are moving in. We have mountains, we have the beach, we have the cities, you know, you name it. There were some really good quality of life. years. Yeah, we got to Asheville. So you know, when you put all that together, what better place to be and have grown your business.

22:01

All right, Daniel. That's again, he did a great job. That's a job. Yeah, I was just gonna say you can add to it if you want.

22:09

Um, yeah, I would say the so the Great Scott Mackenzie recently video visited a great state and shared about it once it was Raleigh.

22:17

That was Carolina exact for? Well, it was we're gonna have a conference

22:22

now. Which is fine, which is fine. We have some good conferences in North Carolina. So do

22:27

I had a great eye? Yeah, there's a good quality of life. Now. I'd probably bring down the age average age or up the age? No, no, yeah. I'm not 3135 Hey, go out of people get a hold of manual.

22:45

Oh, please. Email me or you just EDP nc.com? Very simple, easy. dnc.com Oh, there

22:51

it is. Man, Eduardo.

22:52

And same thing, Charlotte radio.com. You can find more information right there shadow region that Kurt is,

22:58

Nathaniel. All right, we're gonna have all the contact information out on industrial talk. So if you're not, you gotta get a hold of these. If you're going to North Carolina, and they recommend it as a cool stack. No doubt about it. You reach out to these, this would be probably the first step in that process. So reach out to them out at industrial talk.com. Once again, we're broadcasting from FABTECH it is Atlanta, Georgia. It is a busy busy buzzing, and it's exciting. A lot of people like these gents. Yep. Solving problems and making life better. So we're gonna wrap it up on the other side. So stay tuned, we will be right back. You're listening to the industrial talk Podcast Network. How about that for a conversation as we wrap up? That was FABTECH. We were talking to both Nathaniel as well as Eduardo economic development, you need to reach out to them you have all the contact information out on industrial talk, just find their you know, the conversation from Pat deck. And I say FABTECH a couple of times, yes. FABTECH. And, you know, they're pretty active out on LinkedIn, they got madstad cards. And my recommendation, you're looking to move you're looking to find a place for business. You have to connect with these two gents. And make sure that you get all the information about the area and tell you great barbecue, no doubt about it. All right, FABTECH got to put that on your calendar. Great, great location, great opportunity to see real companies solving problems, helping to provide solutions. So that your success all there it was massive. So put that on your calendar. We're gonna have another great conversation as we wrap up from FABTECH shortly so stay tuned. We will be right back.

Transcript

00:04

Welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So put on your hard hat, grab your work boots, and let's get our I

00:22

once again, thank you very much for joining the industrial talk. And thank you so much for your support, we as you can tell, there's chirping chirping going in the background, and we are broadcasting on site. FABTECH is the location. It is in Atlanta, Georgia. And and I gotta tell you, it is exciting. There's a lot of people roaming around. And once again, you know that this platform is dedicated to you, industry professionals all around the world, because you are bold, you are brave, you dare greatly, and you're making the world a better place. That's why this platform celebrates you each and every day. All right, in the hot seat, we have to a twofer. The manual, and Eduardo are in the house. And we're gonna be talking a little bit about whatever they want to talk about. But primarily economic development. Let's get cracking. You don't have to talk about that. If you don't want it.

01:12

It's important. We would love to talk about economics. Yeah, so let's make

01:17

it happen. Before we get into that conversation, let's level set for the listeners out there. Nathaniel to give us a little background of what makes you so passionate about what you do. How did you become a, you know this professionally? Your next, FYI. Right?

01:33

Yeah, of course. And so my background was engineering. I actually graduated I was born and raised in North Carolina, currently working in Gothenburg in North Carolina. After I graduate from university, I went abroad, sort of what university NC State Of course, engineering how ridiculous currently the third largest engineering school in the US just to add that to here's a plug, there you go. There you go. The also the number 17. I'll stop there, but I was. I went abroad for a while doing wastewater treatment, Brian will say surrounding industries helped set up companies and projects overseas. Really, really enjoyed that. And realize there's another aspect of making projects that setup process a whole lot easier. So they came back to North Carolina. Fortunately, North Carolina offers economic development in a partnership. So one of 17 states that use a partnership instead of a using the only the will say the Department of Commerce office or the governor's office, we're actually a public private partnership. So it gives a little bit more flexibility and the ability to actually travel, meet with companies personally and say, Hey, listen, this is how we can integrate your company into a particular region. This is what makes sense for your company. So it really attracted me to the area, or to the industry, per se. And I've been enjoying it ever since. Obviously, with the kind of development you work with all sorts of industries. Be here. FABTECH is great. This is one of my passions, but really is the that general being able to continue to learn, and then also assist companies as I once was on the other side of the spectrum, and really experienced that from this side. It's a hard act to follow. I'm sorry, Eduardo. I'm learning as I go. It's good. Give us a little background.

03:17

Yes. So I'm originally from Costa Rica. But I moved to the US 10 years ago, actually to the shadow region, for my MBA, and I started working with a small business development center, helping intrapreneurs in their communities, just helping them grow, and really in the whole region. And I did that for around eight years was was really rewarding. And up to this day, sometimes I drive down the road and say, like, help that business. And then after that I worked for a technical college or community college as a program manager for Business and Professional Development in workforce and economic development. We help them with customized training, all everything from real estate to leadership. You name it, you know, I managed those programs, before joining the Charlotte Regional Business Alliance, which now I'm in business recruitment, which for the RIT for the Charlotte region, which includes, you know, 10 states in North Carolina, and for in South 10

04:23

counties tend to collaborate because work together. Yes, very much. So. A couple of questions, one, explain. Partnership. What does that mean? You say, Hey, we're, we're this is sort of a economic development arm, but we are in sort of that partnership. And what does that mean? That's different from others?

04:45

Yeah, of course. Well, I mean, there's no real will say perfect way to do economic development. A lot of states do it through the Department of Commerce, and that's great, and they have a lot of success dealing with that. A lot of times with government there tends to be an addition of red tape to As to maybe some bureaucracy, there also tends to be the very difficult to adapt to certain situations, I'll be at turnover setting KPI, even smaller instances, being a state employee, you have a prospect that comes into town and you take him to view a couple of sites, you want to buy him some alcohol, you can't do that. So your your hands are tied in certain areas, there's that doesn't quite have that flexibility. Being a public private partnership means you get that additional flexibility, you can be a little bit more adapting to the environment. And you can see how the industry changes and adapt to that adapt your workforce, adapt how you target and market. And of course, even the smaller things perhaps like employee turnover, setting higher KPIs, purchasing alcohol has made the wood much more accessible. Um, so currently, several states are will say using this model, as opposed to the traditional only to Department of Commerce to the governor's office model, do economic development. North Carolina has had some success doing this. And we're ranked number one by CNBC for the number one state to do business this past year. So building up that success, I would say the partnership model has been very good for us. It may not may or may not be the answer for every state. But from North Carolina, I believe it's been a very good read thus far.

06:13

You touched on upon a lot of points. Now, Eduardo, I want to sort of pull on the string of resource development, there's a churn and and how do you how do you sort of pull this economic development with all of the changes that are taking place within just the workforce workforce development coming and going? And how do you manage that?

06:37

Well, certainly, it's challenging, because like you said, it's constantly moving, it's constantly changing. But part of that is organization like the one that I work for, we try to coordinate those efforts, making sure that everyone understands, you know, what type of industries are coming into the region, what type of jobs are going to be needed in the next five or 10 years working with those universities, like I said, so they can build the programs that they need. So the companies can have the pipeline that we'll need eventually.

07:09

So in that case, you're working with just education to say, hey, we're working to get these type this type of business into our states. And we'll need this type of workforce. So let's work with you universities, college, technical colleges, and be able to create that workforce of that can satisfy that demand. Because that's a big part of what you guys do. Because it's one thing to say, Come on over, come on over business. But then if you don't have the workforce to help them

07:47

it's got you really hit on the head there. 100% very much, though, a very different outreach, maybe four or five years ago to get common development. You got there and you'd, you'd sell the the taxes. So incent proposals. Now, it's do you have people, what is the quality of life? Will I be able to attract people in the future? So if you you saw our booth earlier in the back of our booth, how much industry do you see? You saw rivers, you saw doughnuts? You saw a nice quality of life. It's a little interesting. Yeah.

08:16

It was funny because I'm trying to put it together. God. There's a donor. Tracking. This is the best place for donut manufacturer.

08:27

It's got you know the answer to that, right? It's Yes. The home of Krispy Kreme western North Carolina. Yes. So the revolution picture. There you go. Yeah, that workhorse? Yes. Bringing people No, no, no, it's good.

08:43

We saw an old Krispy Kreme sign. It was like that retro. It was okay. It was like, Oh, that's pretty cool. Okay, yeah, I digress. And aggressive. So how do you do that, Eduardo, how do we? How do we ensure you're, you're, you're buzzing around and? And how do you just ensure that these businesses feel comfortable knowing that we're going to the right place to be successful? We have that great partnership. And I know that we're stepping forward with our best football. How do we do that?

09:18

So I think is a lot of collaboration, making sure that all the partners are in sync. They know they know what it's coming, getting them on the table early in that conversation, so that everyone kind of speak the same language and in when companies come into market, helping them making you know, setting up meetings with the technical colleges or with other employers that are already there that you can tell the story and say hey, you we are already in Charlo. We are in this region. We have been here for this long lead. You know what better than having the another company speak the wrong story about how they have been successful and how maybe another one can do the same, you know, in just help grow that ecosystem that it's already been in place.

10:07

So let me put my hat on. And I, again, technology, blistering, the pace is absolutely blistering. So whatever I know today, tomorrow, I'm sure I'm on version 27. And I'm still sort of evaluating version one. So that's a reality of the marketplace to, then there's certain interesting economic challenges out there that are not just impact, and it's like a manufacturing, whatever the product is, that we are so interred. I mean, it's just interrelated. And every part is so important. What do you see in this sort of put that future hat? And this is going to Nathaniel, what do you see? How do companies sort of deal with the volatility that like, I think I see. And what I hear, let's put it that way, I, God bless those people that are dealing with supply chain and sourcing and all of the other stuff that's associated with just fulfilling

11:10

work in reference to supply chain. I mean, I think that's really something that sort of hit everyone by surprise.

11:16

Whereas with a two by four, very much so.

11:20

And if you noticed, I mean, not in reference to North Carolina that just happened on the East Coast. I think everyone sit back and like, Well, wait a minute. Look what happened to Los Angeles, maybe we need to do something about our ports to Charleston, stretching airport, North Carolina's Jackson airport as well. I mean, there's a lot of money.

11:36

Yes, it dredging. Yeah, they're cleaning it out. They're getting there. Yeah. So So bring it better, larger vessels or whatever.

11:44

Exactly. Exactly. So for example, certain ports, and I mean, I don't want to bash anyone here, but certain ports now only there's only maybe during high tide, you can come in, you turn around and come out. So when it's low tide, that you're not accessible as they really limit your ability there. So it's like, well, you know, if we dredged it's a couple more feet, we can bring in those post Panama ships, we can get a full turn for our service, that that really expands the operations and capability in companies now they're looking for that.

12:12

Yeah, yeah, they are

12:13

very much. So lots going into the railroads, let's go into the actual I will say the road and transportation infrastructure as well. So very much so.

12:21

Have you had Eduardo conversations about more reshoring, onshoring, nearshoring, whatever shoring to bring critical manufacturers back, okay, I can manufacture I've got a portfolio of manufacturing capabilities. I can keep that manufacturing process down there. But I need I need these critical ones. Have you been having those conversations?

12:48

Yes, yes, we have. And I think with the pandemic, and now it's becoming even more important. And you know, like Natalia was saying, what the supply chain issues, a companies are saying, well, we cannot keep for operations on the other side of the world, when people need things like now and quickly. So we're starting to get more of those conversation with companies, the same pay, I think, is maybe the time to get closer to where or consumers are, you know, the US is where they sell most of their products? Well, you know, we've COVID clearly show some of the differences that supply chain has. So we're starting to have a lot of those conversations, there is a lot of interest from international companies to like Eastern Europe, like they're looking at the US too, as another place to set up some local corporations. Because again, you know, they want to make sure they're closer to where they are selling across.

13:44

So with your organization, it let's say I'm a manufacturer, and I got it, and I can I can just go knocking on the door and saying, Hey, this is what I'm thinking and the skill sets the the ability to be able to collaborate and say and get answers to get some insights, at least begin that journey. I can I could definitely reach out to you guys and be able to do that

14:06

right? Of course and please do.

14:10

So So what do you guys do to sort of help get that message out? To anybody?

14:15

And stuff like we're here today.

14:18

And we have a boosted up here on the industrial talk podcast, which happens to be the number one this is not this is all backed up by data. Number one industrial related podcast in the universe. It's bigger than the Galaxy.

14:30

Wow. It's an honor to be here. Yes. Yes. I mean, to ask you a question. This is probably it.

14:40

You will not know what's gonna hit it. Well, I had to be the witness to solve it. Yeah. No.

14:47

Dancer, your question I mean, it states use a variety of different I mean, we do we do the missions obviously we try to, for certain will say specific industries. We try to get officials involved. Obviously we try to make other companies is aware or other artists associations aware of maybe certain industrial benefits of a particular region, as opposed to other regions? A lot of it's just making, putting that information out there and letting people know there's really no hindrance or negative to reaching out to a state economic developer and say, Hey, listen, what would it look like if we did a facility there, a lot of states had a building, or had programs that deal with existing buildings have have programs that are dealing with new greenfield projects, hey, listen, it just so happens, we have this facility here, we can back it up with a certain level of support financially, for us certain trading programs for the local community college. And just to explore those options. I mean, there's no, no hands are being tied, and nothing's being signed. But just to know, hey, listen, these are my growth options in the future. And this is maybe how state a or region A can support me as opposed to reach A, B.

15:46

C, I love that. That's why I like the fact that I can come over and approach you and just have that conversation. I'm a big advocate of just constantly trying to educate, I don't have the answers. It's moving fast. I sense it out there. So it's really important to be able to at least know that I can go to you and it's like, Hey, I'm thinking about this and be able to have that sort of insights and guidance. I don't see anything wrong. any pushback on that? Oh, no,

16:15

not at all. That's why we are here for you. The specific guy represent the shadow region, but even in the North Carolina State, many people don't really know the great assets that the state has in the region has. And that's where our job is to help people realize that there is an opportunity here that they may not be part of what they have been thinking about. Because, you know, usually people are there other markets are well known in the US that even especially if you're thinking people outside of the US, but they know is Chicago and New York. Yeah.

16:50

The big markets are still California. Yeah. Nobody knows about that.

16:55

But but the Carolinas they don't necessarily know about it. So it's just educating them about it. So once they know about the, what do we have here? You can tell when they first come to Charlotte region is like, wow, I didn't realize that you have the fifth busiest airport of the world. It's already here.

17:17

Yeah. And all of a sudden, I'm getting have a layover in Charlotte. Like,

17:22

oh, yeah, happen. You're flying American. I see. Yeah.

17:30

No, no, that's, that's really interesting. Now, Nathaniel, is there. Are there any industries? What what is that general focus? You know, the say, Everybody come on here come on to North Carolina, or they're really sort of focused industry

17:45

in to be honest. And that's why it's a good idea to reach out to the economic developers. Hey, listen, this is this is my industry. Is this a good fit? Obviously, as a state income developer, I have to say every nurse is good fit North Carolina, right. In reality, maybe off the podcast, we have a more honest conversation, but not to be. I mean, obviously, there's certain areas in North Carolina, we tend to RSA on a regional basis, tend to handle a little bit better. The Southeast region for established tends to have a much higher percentage of GDP comes from traditional manufacturing in North Carolina that dates back to your traditional furniture, textile havens. Why and even now we're just sort of was a transferred or evolved into bio manufacturing, a lot of metal fabrication other manufacturers in the area. And so it just looking at, okay, well, we have these industries, but progress is North Carolina, what resources does this take that will come with put into these industries? So in North Carolina as a region, you'd find? All right, well, what we have we have large military bases, Fort Bragg largest military base, arguably in the world, about 20,000 kids leaving the bases every year when I say kids, maybe average 2020. Trained, why don't we put some resources into programs to connect these people are going to basis to manufacturers local, a good percentage of wanna stay local, anyways, their skills or discipline is a great workforce to tap on to so we could do that. So each state in the region is going to have their own strength. It may be tech, it may be general manufacturing might have application, but I mean, you can speak to state developers, Hey, these are the programs you have. We have on base this what you can tap into even if you're here, or you're thinking about being here, and this is where we can maybe improve your stay our business in Africa region.

19:24

I really like. I like that. Because if I was a business, I would definitely make sure that wherever I go, I know that there's that. That resource. That would be my driver. It's just skilled resources. I got it. There's a building. Yeah, you've got all of the main, you know, transportation stuff. I got it, but

19:44

it's so important now. Just everything 100% Very much so the live cast is published. They do the I wonder they call it the workforce. Talent scorecard, I believe, every year of which states just basically net properly Shouldn't gate net population loss? You could probably guess the states have the highest net population gain. Get your Florida up there of course, Texas, Arizona and stuff. North North Carolina. Yeah, of course

20:15

North Carolina was

20:17

your 567 on that list you have Tennessee of South Carolina of Georgia, just manufacturing Haven. So what we're seeing right now if you look at the the other other states on the other end of the spectrum is your New York and California stuff. We're seeing a lot of that tradition manufactured leaving from there, not necessarily going to North Carolina and please shop around but I mean going to Texas, going to Florida, go into Georgia, go into Tennessee, South Carolina, etc. Tends to be those areas that have those programs, more structure to manufacturers.

20:47

I do as we close out give me a parting shot. What make make your case of coming to North Carolina. Come on Eduardo. Do not not not. And then your next Nathaniel, you can't you can't plagiarize what he said, Oh, please.

21:07

Well, I will say that it's a great place to do business there is I really, I would say a big pool but there is a workforce that is available, man like Nathan has just said there's many people moving into the state every time just to the Charlotte region. 84 people a day are moving to Charlotte, in the average age of those people are 31 years. So if you can see that, you know, that's a good source. People can tap in and with that, too is North Carolina also provides the right lifestyle for those people are moving in. We have mountains, we have the beach, we have the cities, you know, you name it. There were some really good quality of life. years. Yeah, we got to Asheville. So you know, when you put all that together, what better place to be and have grown your business.

22:01

All right, Daniel. That's again, he did a great job. That's a job. Yeah, I was just gonna say you can add to it if you want.

22:09

Um, yeah, I would say the so the Great Scott Mackenzie recently video visited a great state and shared about it once it was Raleigh.

22:17

That was Carolina exact for? Well, it was we're gonna have a conference

22:22

now. Which is fine, which is fine. We have some good conferences in North Carolina. So do

22:27

I had a great eye? Yeah, there's a good quality of life. Now. I'd probably bring down the age average age or up the age? No, no, yeah. I'm not 3135 Hey, go out of people get a hold of manual.

22:45

Oh, please. Email me or you just EDP nc.com? Very simple, easy. dnc.com Oh, there

22:51

it is. Man, Eduardo.

22:52

And same thing, Charlotte radio.com. You can find more information right there shadow region that Kurt is,

22:58

Nathaniel. All right, we're gonna have all the contact information out on industrial talk. So if you're not, you gotta get a hold of these. If you're going to North Carolina, and they recommend it as a cool stack. No doubt about it. You reach out to these, this would be probably the first step in that process. So reach out to them out at industrial talk.com. Once again, we're broadcasting from FABTECH it is Atlanta, Georgia. It is a busy busy buzzing, and it's exciting. A lot of people like these gents. Yep. Solving problems and making life better. So we're gonna wrap it up on the other side. So stay tuned, we will be right back. You're listening to the industrial talk Podcast Network. How about that for a conversation as we wrap up? That was FABTECH. We were talking to both Nathaniel as well as Eduardo economic development, you need to reach out to them you have all the contact information out on industrial talk, just find their you know, the conversation from Pat deck. And I say FABTECH a couple of times, yes. FABTECH. And, you know, they're pretty active out on LinkedIn, they got madstad cards. And my recommendation, you're looking to move you're looking to find a place for business. You have to connect with these two gents. And make sure that you get all the information about the area and tell you great barbecue, no doubt about it. All right, FABTECH got to put that on your calendar. Great, great location, great opportunity to see real companies solving problems, helping to provide solutions. So that your success all there it was massive. So put that on your calendar. We're gonna have another great conversation as we wrap up from FABTECH shortly so stay tuned. We will be right back.

About the author, Scott

I am Scott MacKenzie, husband, father, and passionate industry educator. From humble beginnings as a lathing contractor and certified journeyman/lineman to an Undergraduate and Master’s Degree in Business Administration, I have applied every aspect of my education and training to lead and influence. I believe in serving and adding value wherever I am called.

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