Shon Isenhour with Eruditio

Industrial Talk is onsite at the 30th Annual SMRP conference and speaking with to Shon Isenhour, owner of Eruditio, LLC about “Consistent, timely and current education is vital to your asset management strategy”. Get the answers to your “Reliability” questions along with Shon's  unique insight on the “How” on this Industrial Talk interview!

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SHON ISENHOUR'S CONTACT INFORMATION:

Personal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shonisenhour/

Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/eruditio-llc/

Company Website: https://eruditiollc.com/

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PODCAST TRANSCRIPT:

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

people, education, Shon, maintenance, industry, reliability, conversation, ibl, technology, industrial, Shon, work, implementation, irreducible, world, asset management, part, collegial, storeroom, charleston

00:00

This episode of industrial Talk is brought to you by RDI Technologies RDI Technologies is the pioneer in motion amplification. Their proprietary technology enables users to see and measure motion impossible to the human eye and turning complex data into easy-to-understand videos to solve maintenance challenges quickly and safely. For more information, go to RDITechnologies.com. Also, AiDash.  AiDash is on a mission to create a greener, cleaner, safer planet from space. AiDash helps core industries become more resilient, efficient, and sustainable through the power of satellites and AI. Go out to AiDash.com Find out more

00:51

welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So put on your hard hat, grab your work boots.

01:08

And let's get right once again, thank you very much for joining industrial talk a platform that is dedicated to industry professionals all around the world. We celebrate you here because you are bold, brave, you dare greatly you collaborate, you're solving problems. You're making my life better, and you're making the world a better place. Why not celebrate you? Via I'm sitting next to Shon, I'm celebrating him real soon. And we are broadcasting from the 30th annual SMRP conference here in Raleigh, North Carolina. And if you're a maintenance professional, you need to be here. If you are a reliability, and you're passionate about reliability and asset management, you need to be here. That's SMRP absolutely make that happen. All right in the hot seat we have Shon here in the show is the company. Let's get cracking with the conversation. You know what I'm running out of room I'm running out of Nope. I'm looking at my notebook and I can't I can't I need notes in the notes. No, I can't write anymore. There's just it's just like Blair like a player? Player. Right? There's player knows, right?

02:14

I don't know what to do. And Blair guys pretty good guy to talk to there. He's quite chirpy, he is. He's fun. If we look close, we may be able to see him from here.

02:23

Oh, I already is I yell at him from this distance. But it looks like he's got it's got a group around a group

02:29

around them. They must be have something so the total

02:33

sound dish. Big time.

02:35

Yeah. All right.

02:36

It's about time. This listeners This is a probably a 27 year in the making conversations and I haven't I've been I've been running Shon down for 27 I'm not exaggerating. Not even a little bit. One bit. Maybe it's gonna be a yeah, anyway. But we were able to be you know why I was able to get a hold of them because his his booth is right to my left and I'm I stare at him and stare at Eruditio. So it's pretty much a shame conversation.

03:05

But I'm here.

03:08

Excited. All right, for the listeners out there. Shon, give us a little background on who you are. And then we're going to jump into era DCO and all of the reliability stuff.

03:18

Sounds good. Well, my name is Shon Isenhour, and I am from Charleston, South Carolina. I get the pleasure of living near the beach every day when when they'll let me stay in Charleston, as you and I've talked about. I've been on the road quite a bit this year with our clients. So it's been it's been really busy. But I am the owner of your D show. And I didn't know that. Yeah, yeah. I'm the owner of your D show. And and so we live on that. Yeah, well, not exactly. Not exactly. No, I think here's your house is a little nicer. Right. All right. How

03:50

long has she been in business?

03:52

We've been in business almost eight years. Wow.

03:55

What does the irreducible mean?

03:57

It means to teach and learn at the same time. There are few other definitions. It's very much about the educational side. So you know, for us, we're an education first consultancy, and so your Nisha rings pretty true.

04:10

See, I'm always about education, and collaboration, talking, finding people with solutions, working together to come up with and solving problems, and of course, innovation. Hey, there's that your fan?

04:26

I don't know. But he's cool. He's a fad. He's gonna sit and watch Oh,

04:29

I know you. Sorry, we're on a podcast but we're gonna have a conversation to check it out. Okay, so so that's cool, because it's it really is and especially in the world of reliability maintenance. I just don't see how you can not be successful at it if you're not keeping current with the velocity of things that are changing.

04:56

Yes, definitely a lot of things changing. I mean, you know, a lot of things do say they say that will start over. A lot of things stay the same. That's right. You said you sort

05:05

of flew close to the sun

05:07

on that was right. That was a little close. So yeah, it's it's interesting. I mean, we've got a lot of new technologies coming to the field. We're seeing technologies used in new ways, which is always fun. But you know, at the end of the day, a lot of the basics, the blocking and tackling has stayed the same for years.

05:23

But don't you think that there's they're still having the same conversations?

05:26

You know, in some ways there are we were actually joking over in the yard. He shared with yesterday that we think we can take some of the presentations from SMRP, 20 years ago, and deliver them today and blow people's socks off with them again,

05:38

that's the case you're absolutely spot on. It's it's I think, I think today, this time, I think some of the conversations is there's that innovation component. Yeah, got it. We're all anyway, yeah. And it changes rapidly. And everybody's sort of hanging around the watercooler and they're saying, yeah, what if we do this? Here's a new use case, wow, blah, blah. But I think I think the technology and that passion for technology gets is a head of the human side, very much. Like it's way over here. And, and you're on version two, you know, already seven, I'm just trying to figure out one,

06:17

you know, yeah, I think that's very true. You know, we see a lot of times the technology truly does get out ahead of people change. And you know, let's be honest, as engineers, we love new technology. We love new gadgets. I mean, check out these mics were using right?

06:29

Yeah, they're kind of high end. This one's handmade right there. Yeah,

06:32

that's, that's pretty fancy.

06:36

Steam functions. It's right. And there it is. There's a reason you

06:39

like it. I know. It looks great. And that's exactly the same with all these folks out here. Right? They love that technology. But at the end of the day, if we can't get people to adopt that technology, or use that technology within their business processes, doesn't matter.

06:53

Yeah, if you have a cure for cancer, nobody knows about it, and nobody uses it. Well, those who died from cancer. Yeah. And that's, that's a dead shame. So with that said, era DCO. If you if you're you're truly about or you're looking at the education, how do you approach projects, clients? What what is that value proposition?

07:16

Well, for us, I mean, we really try to make sure that we are first coming to them with a solution that they can sustain. Right? And for us, that's part of why it's education first, because if we educate them on what it is, and why we're doing it, then they understand it, instead of just coming in and doing it for them and handing that to them. Because then there's no ownership. Yeah, no, he's just kind of going to fade away over time. Right, you know, entropy kicks in and it starts to go back to the way it was,

07:42

if I was an engineer, I would know what entropy would. That's right. I just know that it's okay.

07:47

I just remember some class in college, you know, we're just down the road from NC State. I graduated from there. So you know, it, pull it out from there.

07:57

But the reality is, is that that I liked that approach. I don't think I don't think you can. And granted, I'm not I don't want to simplify maintenance. I don't want to simplify asset management, reliability. It's, it's, it's a complex ecosystem, things change all the time I got it. But if you're not an organization that's committed to education, if you're not an organization that is committed to upskilling, I mean, if you want to retain people, I get the I get the risk, but you need to upskill because things change,

08:35

they do. Are you a part of that? Well, and they, you know, they degrade Right? And, you know, depending on what the topic is, a lot of people talk about the half life of education, right? If you're not using it, once a year, then can you really truly still execute whatever that is, whatever that task may be moving forward,

08:52

you're you're spot on in AI? So how does, how do you do that? How do you go into an organization? If you say, okay, education, is it I want you to get on a shelf and take us through that process of, because the reality is just just so that we're all on the same page. This is a human conversation. Technology is a technology. Yes, we gravitated towards it, because it's just sort of cool. But it's a human conversation.

09:18

It absolutely is at the end of the day. So you know, one of the models that we use, and it varies depending on what the outcome is the clients looking forward and where they're headed. But, you know, one of the things we think is really important, and we use our in our IBL process, it's a blended learning process that trains individuals, you get an acronym there that IBL inspired blended learning. Alright, and it's a it's a process that we use internally to develop folks basically into internal consultants in certain fields. We've got it available for for maintenance managers and reliability engineers, but we also have it for planners and schedulers and MRO storeroom. And so what we believe is If we can get folks into that process, and it's you know, it's It's project based, it's got a coach that they work with, for an extended period of time, you know, they're actually doing the things that they've learned and submitting them to the coach that allows those folks to really become the experts inside the facility, then we can start talking about the implementation, but now it's supported within the organization. So if you look at many of the implementations we do, will have focus teams, and there'll be an IBL leader that leads that focus team. And as you go through that, that that person knows the big picture knows how it all fits together. But the focus team focuses on the details around work control, or the storeroom, or planning or scheduling. You know, they're focusing on those, but at the end of the day, the ideals job is to make sure that we pull it all together, that it never becomes a silo that we don't just have the storeroom over here and a reliability engineering over here and planning and scheduling over here. So it gives us a very cohesive implementation with internal consultants, internal leaders that understand what the big picture looks like.

11:16

Is there a specific industry that you focus on? Is this sort of agnostic? Of course, you're gonna have to use the the acronyms and the terminologies specific to the industry? Is this something that is just industry and it's agnostic,

11:33

it's really pretty agnostic. I mean, originally, we would have said, you know, it's a manufacturing thing, right. But now we find ourselves doing it in a lot of facilities. And the process works just the same, we use what we call our ideal ideal light bulb model. And it's just an implementation strategy. And we first started out in, in automotive, and then we took it to food, and then we've taken it to pharmaceuticals, and discrete manufacturing, and now facilities. And so it's a model that is repeatable, we know what to expect, we know when folks will get to certain points, and we can proactively help them manage some of the risk associated with it. But it really doesn't care where you apply it. Because it's it's agnostic.

12:14

So what's the impetus? So if a company comes, what pain are they dealing with? Like I just it's like, again, I'm all in me, sort of the beginning part will tell it take us through that, what am I

12:30

struggling, what you'll see, I mean, really, there's two things, it'll either be that they need to increase their throughput. So they they're in a sold out environment, they need to make more product, everything they want to focus on is making sure they can deliver what their customers need. That could be one side of the spectrum, the other side could be an industry where they need to cut their cost. So they need to lower their maintenance cost. And so they're going to do everything they can to make sure that we can do maintenance efficiently and effectively reducing the total ownership cost for those assets. Now, you can also have to do both, you know, there are some that are in industries where they need to make more, but they need to make it less. And so you see different mixes and actually, you know those different perspectives, and what they're looking for dictate a little bit about the implementation strategy.

13:21

I've got to ask the question, because I mean, you've started introduced to eight years ago, all of that good stuff. What were you doing prior to where you always sort of passionate about that education? What is it?

13:33

Yeah, so I started years ago, I came out of industry, I work for Exxon Mobil worked for a company called Sunoco, and then transitioned to over probably 1520 years ago in the consulting world. And once doing that actually got involved here at SMRP. And I can't say enough about the SMRP organization, and what they provided to me, but one of the things that they did for me is they allowed me to be the Director of Education. And it just really ignited my passion for helping people learn these things, so that they can sustain them long term.

14:09

I think you're onto something and it's always there's there's no way, by the way, everybody's packing up except me and you're the shield, because you're here. I feel I feel like a bomb went off and oh, man, I'm missing out. I don't know what the deal is. But, uh, we'll join him soon. Yeah,

14:28

we'll start folding things down.

14:30

During the Congress. That's right. Hey, can you grab that over there? Have it all packed up? I'm, I'm always passionate about education. And that's just education in whatever form it is. Because I think that that's a that's a that's an asset that can never be taken away, taken away. And I think that where you're at is empathy.

14:51

Well, I would say you know, at the end of the day, the only thief is time, right? If you don't use what you learned, you will start to see it go away. But other than that, it's yours to care. on and you know, I've kind of become a bit of a just a learner. You know, I started picking up musical instruments and fly tying is you know, and fly fishing and you know, they're they're things that I do. I'm not good at any of I'll be honest, don't come to my house for music. Right? But it's that process. It's going through that understating need to get the Gibson, is that what it is? That's all I need. Right here. That'll fix it.

15:26

They won't fix it, it will just it's a it's a it's, it's, you can play and it's like, it's like, rock, whatever. Anyway, you're playing with your guitar. And that's listening to you. And it's, Oh, you got to check it all.

15:39

I meant to check that out. Because, you know, we like shiny objects. And it's inexpensive, but it's cool. If Well, if it's a silver bullet, it makes me look like a rock star. I'm isn't a

15:49

silver bullet? Yes. Yeah, I agree with you. 100%. And I think in the world of maintenance and reliability, I think that it's at its core at its base SMRP. It's always about education. People come to this particular event, and people come to this conference. It's to learn more, because the industry changes.

16:08

Yeah, let's get I mean, you definitely got to give them a shout out for this your show. It's been it's been amazing. I mean, you know, you come here, there's there's over 1000 people here, people in my sessions, it was unbelievable how interactive they were, they were asking questions, they were having discussions with their peers, you know, it was just it was a very energizing, very energizing couple days.

16:28

And if you're in that business, if you're in the reliability master and asset management, maintenance, whatever, it's so collegial, everybody's here. They want to know, they want to kick us out. Because of you, Shon, but as long as I possibly can, after our 28 year run around. So, but it's it's so collegial because people know, I was struggling over here. I have someone here try this. And I and I think that that's a beautiful thing.

16:59

Well, I saw people in the sessions, you know, they would hear what somebody talked about how they had solved the problem. And then after the session, they get together and talk about it. And you know, that can be completely from different industries. In fact, one that I'm thinking of right now, I think one guy was pharmaceuticals nearly I was automotive. You can't get much different. Right? But but they had the same issues and they walked out together, they probably went to lunch and talked about it. You know, and I think that's the environment we want to create is where people can really learn from people that they don't consider their peers, but they really are.

17:30

I love it. I love it. I hate to call it quits here. I'm enjoying this conversation. Because I find that you're a brother from another

17:40

mother. This has been a lot of fun. Here's your big deal. Everybody. Everybody that has a hand assembled Mike.

17:52

Yeah, that's a that's a shout out to let me comment. Here. What's the name of that? It's on your trumpet ears, ear trumpet out of Portland, Oregon. It's very nice. Yeah, I'll tell you the story after this. All right. Sounds good. How do they get a hold of your shot?

18:10

They can reach out to me on LinkedIn at Shon Isenhour. You can also reach me right on my cell phone 843-810-4446 or at eruditio.com.

18:21

There are salespeople. And then there are salespeople. He's the ladder. Shon, thank you very much. I appreciate your time. Thank you have a great one. All right, listeners. We're gonna, as you can tell by the the clinking in the background, apparently we're wrapping it up here at the 30 have annual SMRP conference. I'm telling you put this on your calendar. I believe it's in October of next year it is in Orlando, it is a must attend event. Great people like Shon, and maybe we could probably corner him in for another conversation shortly. All right, we're gonna wrap it up. And we're gonna have all his contact information out on industrial talk. So stay tuned, do not go away.

18:59

You're listening to the industrial talk, Podcast Network.

19:04

Great conversation with Shon absolutely wonderful, great venue, by the way, go to SMRP. And it's in Orlando this year. Put that on your calendar. If you're in the asset management, if you're in reliability, if you're you're just trying to manage costs, which you should be, you need to be all engaged with SMRP Great, great community of professionals. SMRP All right. So I go out to Shon stat card. This is just wrapping it up. So I got this stat card. And it's all great. You know, you know that stat card, this is what he does. This is what he does. The best part about that is that yeah, we do education training, and all of them focus on project base, but the best part about it, and I gotta get out there and I didn't even ask about that is that they're located there. We are located aboard the USS Yorktown. How about how about that? This should be on the top priority. You gotta reach out to Shon and Team Eruditio I'm irreducible, just because that's pretty doggone cool. That's off the charts stuff. All right, you have to be about it. You have to be about educating, collaborating, and of course, innovating, because you need to succeed. You need to reach out to people like, like Shon and team introduced to so that you can succeed. It's important stuff. All right, be bold, be brave, daring greatly. Hang out with Shon team. They're the show and you're gonna just change the world. Thank you very much for joining and your supportive industrial talk. We're gonna have another great conversation coming from SMRP shortly so stay tuned.

Transcript

00:00

This episode of industrial Talk is brought to you by RDI Technologies RDI Technologies is the pioneer in motion amplification. Their proprietary technology enables users to see and measure motion impossible to the human eye and turning complex data into easy-to-understand videos to solve maintenance challenges quickly and safely. For more information, go to RDITechnologies.com. Also, AiDash.  AiDash is on a mission to create a greener, cleaner, safer planet from space. AiDash helps core industries become more resilient, efficient, and sustainable through the power of satellites and AI. Go out to AiDash.com Find out more

00:51

welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So put on your hard hat, grab your work boots.

01:08

And let's get right once again, thank you very much for joining industrial talk a platform that is dedicated to industry professionals all around the world. We celebrate you here because you are bold, brave, you dare greatly you collaborate, you're solving problems. You're making my life better, and you're making the world a better place. Why not celebrate you? Via I'm sitting next to Shon, I'm celebrating him real soon. And we are broadcasting from the 30th annual SMRP conference here in Raleigh, North Carolina. And if you're a maintenance professional, you need to be here. If you are a reliability, and you're passionate about reliability and asset management, you need to be here. That's SMRP absolutely make that happen. All right in the hot seat we have Shon here in the show is the company. Let's get cracking with the conversation. You know what I'm running out of room I'm running out of Nope. I'm looking at my notebook and I can't I can't I need notes in the notes. No, I can't write anymore. There's just it's just like Blair like a player? Player. Right? There's player knows, right?

02:14

I don't know what to do. And Blair guys pretty good guy to talk to there. He's quite chirpy, he is. He's fun. If we look close, we may be able to see him from here.

02:23

Oh, I already is I yell at him from this distance. But it looks like he's got it's got a group around a group

02:29

around them. They must be have something so the total

02:33

sound dish. Big time.

02:35

Yeah. All right.

02:36

It's about time. This listeners This is a probably a 27 year in the making conversations and I haven't I've been I've been running Shon down for 27 I'm not exaggerating. Not even a little bit. One bit. Maybe it's gonna be a yeah, anyway. But we were able to be you know why I was able to get a hold of them because his his booth is right to my left and I'm I stare at him and stare at Eruditio. So it's pretty much a shame conversation.

03:05

But I'm here.

03:08

Excited. All right, for the listeners out there. Shon, give us a little background on who you are. And then we're going to jump into era DCO and all of the reliability stuff.

03:18

Sounds good. Well, my name is Shon Isenhour, and I am from Charleston, South Carolina. I get the pleasure of living near the beach every day when when they'll let me stay in Charleston, as you and I've talked about. I've been on the road quite a bit this year with our clients. So it's been it's been really busy. But I am the owner of your D show. And I didn't know that. Yeah, yeah. I'm the owner of your D show. And and so we live on that. Yeah, well, not exactly. Not exactly. No, I think here's your house is a little nicer. Right. All right. How

03:50

long has she been in business?

03:52

We've been in business almost eight years. Wow.

03:55

What does the irreducible mean?

03:57

It means to teach and learn at the same time. There are few other definitions. It's very much about the educational side. So you know, for us, we're an education first consultancy, and so your Nisha rings pretty true.

04:10

See, I'm always about education, and collaboration, talking, finding people with solutions, working together to come up with and solving problems, and of course, innovation. Hey, there's that your fan?

04:26

I don't know. But he's cool. He's a fad. He's gonna sit and watch Oh,

04:29

I know you. Sorry, we're on a podcast but we're gonna have a conversation to check it out. Okay, so so that's cool, because it's it really is and especially in the world of reliability maintenance. I just don't see how you can not be successful at it if you're not keeping current with the velocity of things that are changing.

04:56

Yes, definitely a lot of things changing. I mean, you know, a lot of things do say they say that will start over. A lot of things stay the same. That's right. You said you sort

05:05

of flew close to the sun

05:07

on that was right. That was a little close. So yeah, it's it's interesting. I mean, we've got a lot of new technologies coming to the field. We're seeing technologies used in new ways, which is always fun. But you know, at the end of the day, a lot of the basics, the blocking and tackling has stayed the same for years.

05:23

But don't you think that there's they're still having the same conversations?

05:26

You know, in some ways there are we were actually joking over in the yard. He shared with yesterday that we think we can take some of the presentations from SMRP, 20 years ago, and deliver them today and blow people's socks off with them again,

05:38

that's the case you're absolutely spot on. It's it's I think, I think today, this time, I think some of the conversations is there's that innovation component. Yeah, got it. We're all anyway, yeah. And it changes rapidly. And everybody's sort of hanging around the watercooler and they're saying, yeah, what if we do this? Here's a new use case, wow, blah, blah. But I think I think the technology and that passion for technology gets is a head of the human side, very much. Like it's way over here. And, and you're on version two, you know, already seven, I'm just trying to figure out one,

06:17

you know, yeah, I think that's very true. You know, we see a lot of times the technology truly does get out ahead of people change. And you know, let's be honest, as engineers, we love new technology. We love new gadgets. I mean, check out these mics were using right?

06:29

Yeah, they're kind of high end. This one's handmade right there. Yeah,

06:32

that's, that's pretty fancy.

06:36

Steam functions. It's right. And there it is. There's a reason you

06:39

like it. I know. It looks great. And that's exactly the same with all these folks out here. Right? They love that technology. But at the end of the day, if we can't get people to adopt that technology, or use that technology within their business processes, doesn't matter.

06:53

Yeah, if you have a cure for cancer, nobody knows about it, and nobody uses it. Well, those who died from cancer. Yeah. And that's, that's a dead shame. So with that said, era DCO. If you if you're you're truly about or you're looking at the education, how do you approach projects, clients? What what is that value proposition?

07:16

Well, for us, I mean, we really try to make sure that we are first coming to them with a solution that they can sustain. Right? And for us, that's part of why it's education first, because if we educate them on what it is, and why we're doing it, then they understand it, instead of just coming in and doing it for them and handing that to them. Because then there's no ownership. Yeah, no, he's just kind of going to fade away over time. Right, you know, entropy kicks in and it starts to go back to the way it was,

07:42

if I was an engineer, I would know what entropy would. That's right. I just know that it's okay.

07:47

I just remember some class in college, you know, we're just down the road from NC State. I graduated from there. So you know, it, pull it out from there.

07:57

But the reality is, is that that I liked that approach. I don't think I don't think you can. And granted, I'm not I don't want to simplify maintenance. I don't want to simplify asset management, reliability. It's, it's, it's a complex ecosystem, things change all the time I got it. But if you're not an organization that's committed to education, if you're not an organization that is committed to upskilling, I mean, if you want to retain people, I get the I get the risk, but you need to upskill because things change,

08:35

they do. Are you a part of that? Well, and they, you know, they degrade Right? And, you know, depending on what the topic is, a lot of people talk about the half life of education, right? If you're not using it, once a year, then can you really truly still execute whatever that is, whatever that task may be moving forward,

08:52

you're you're spot on in AI? So how does, how do you do that? How do you go into an organization? If you say, okay, education, is it I want you to get on a shelf and take us through that process of, because the reality is just just so that we're all on the same page. This is a human conversation. Technology is a technology. Yes, we gravitated towards it, because it's just sort of cool. But it's a human conversation.

09:18

It absolutely is at the end of the day. So you know, one of the models that we use, and it varies depending on what the outcome is the clients looking forward and where they're headed. But, you know, one of the things we think is really important, and we use our in our IBL process, it's a blended learning process that trains individuals, you get an acronym there that IBL inspired blended learning. Alright, and it's a it's a process that we use internally to develop folks basically into internal consultants in certain fields. We've got it available for for maintenance managers and reliability engineers, but we also have it for planners and schedulers and MRO storeroom. And so what we believe is If we can get folks into that process, and it's you know, it's It's project based, it's got a coach that they work with, for an extended period of time, you know, they're actually doing the things that they've learned and submitting them to the coach that allows those folks to really become the experts inside the facility, then we can start talking about the implementation, but now it's supported within the organization. So if you look at many of the implementations we do, will have focus teams, and there'll be an IBL leader that leads that focus team. And as you go through that, that that person knows the big picture knows how it all fits together. But the focus team focuses on the details around work control, or the storeroom, or planning or scheduling. You know, they're focusing on those, but at the end of the day, the ideals job is to make sure that we pull it all together, that it never becomes a silo that we don't just have the storeroom over here and a reliability engineering over here and planning and scheduling over here. So it gives us a very cohesive implementation with internal consultants, internal leaders that understand what the big picture looks like.

11:16

Is there a specific industry that you focus on? Is this sort of agnostic? Of course, you're gonna have to use the the acronyms and the terminologies specific to the industry? Is this something that is just industry and it's agnostic,

11:33

it's really pretty agnostic. I mean, originally, we would have said, you know, it's a manufacturing thing, right. But now we find ourselves doing it in a lot of facilities. And the process works just the same, we use what we call our ideal ideal light bulb model. And it's just an implementation strategy. And we first started out in, in automotive, and then we took it to food, and then we've taken it to pharmaceuticals, and discrete manufacturing, and now facilities. And so it's a model that is repeatable, we know what to expect, we know when folks will get to certain points, and we can proactively help them manage some of the risk associated with it. But it really doesn't care where you apply it. Because it's it's agnostic.

12:14

So what's the impetus? So if a company comes, what pain are they dealing with? Like I just it's like, again, I'm all in me, sort of the beginning part will tell it take us through that, what am I

12:30

struggling, what you'll see, I mean, really, there's two things, it'll either be that they need to increase their throughput. So they they're in a sold out environment, they need to make more product, everything they want to focus on is making sure they can deliver what their customers need. That could be one side of the spectrum, the other side could be an industry where they need to cut their cost. So they need to lower their maintenance cost. And so they're going to do everything they can to make sure that we can do maintenance efficiently and effectively reducing the total ownership cost for those assets. Now, you can also have to do both, you know, there are some that are in industries where they need to make more, but they need to make it less. And so you see different mixes and actually, you know those different perspectives, and what they're looking for dictate a little bit about the implementation strategy.

13:21

I've got to ask the question, because I mean, you've started introduced to eight years ago, all of that good stuff. What were you doing prior to where you always sort of passionate about that education? What is it?

13:33

Yeah, so I started years ago, I came out of industry, I work for Exxon Mobil worked for a company called Sunoco, and then transitioned to over probably 1520 years ago in the consulting world. And once doing that actually got involved here at SMRP. And I can't say enough about the SMRP organization, and what they provided to me, but one of the things that they did for me is they allowed me to be the Director of Education. And it just really ignited my passion for helping people learn these things, so that they can sustain them long term.

14:09

I think you're onto something and it's always there's there's no way, by the way, everybody's packing up except me and you're the shield, because you're here. I feel I feel like a bomb went off and oh, man, I'm missing out. I don't know what the deal is. But, uh, we'll join him soon. Yeah,

14:28

we'll start folding things down.

14:30

During the Congress. That's right. Hey, can you grab that over there? Have it all packed up? I'm, I'm always passionate about education. And that's just education in whatever form it is. Because I think that that's a that's a that's an asset that can never be taken away, taken away. And I think that where you're at is empathy.

14:51

Well, I would say you know, at the end of the day, the only thief is time, right? If you don't use what you learned, you will start to see it go away. But other than that, it's yours to care. on and you know, I've kind of become a bit of a just a learner. You know, I started picking up musical instruments and fly tying is you know, and fly fishing and you know, they're they're things that I do. I'm not good at any of I'll be honest, don't come to my house for music. Right? But it's that process. It's going through that understating need to get the Gibson, is that what it is? That's all I need. Right here. That'll fix it.

15:26

They won't fix it, it will just it's a it's a it's, it's, you can play and it's like, it's like, rock, whatever. Anyway, you're playing with your guitar. And that's listening to you. And it's, Oh, you got to check it all.

15:39

I meant to check that out. Because, you know, we like shiny objects. And it's inexpensive, but it's cool. If Well, if it's a silver bullet, it makes me look like a rock star. I'm isn't a

15:49

silver bullet? Yes. Yeah, I agree with you. 100%. And I think in the world of maintenance and reliability, I think that it's at its core at its base SMRP. It's always about education. People come to this particular event, and people come to this conference. It's to learn more, because the industry changes.

16:08

Yeah, let's get I mean, you definitely got to give them a shout out for this your show. It's been it's been amazing. I mean, you know, you come here, there's there's over 1000 people here, people in my sessions, it was unbelievable how interactive they were, they were asking questions, they were having discussions with their peers, you know, it was just it was a very energizing, very energizing couple days.

16:28

And if you're in that business, if you're in the reliability master and asset management, maintenance, whatever, it's so collegial, everybody's here. They want to know, they want to kick us out. Because of you, Shon, but as long as I possibly can, after our 28 year run around. So, but it's it's so collegial because people know, I was struggling over here. I have someone here try this. And I and I think that that's a beautiful thing.

16:59

Well, I saw people in the sessions, you know, they would hear what somebody talked about how they had solved the problem. And then after the session, they get together and talk about it. And you know, that can be completely from different industries. In fact, one that I'm thinking of right now, I think one guy was pharmaceuticals nearly I was automotive. You can't get much different. Right? But but they had the same issues and they walked out together, they probably went to lunch and talked about it. You know, and I think that's the environment we want to create is where people can really learn from people that they don't consider their peers, but they really are.

17:30

I love it. I love it. I hate to call it quits here. I'm enjoying this conversation. Because I find that you're a brother from another

17:40

mother. This has been a lot of fun. Here's your big deal. Everybody. Everybody that has a hand assembled Mike.

17:52

Yeah, that's a that's a shout out to let me comment. Here. What's the name of that? It's on your trumpet ears, ear trumpet out of Portland, Oregon. It's very nice. Yeah, I'll tell you the story after this. All right. Sounds good. How do they get a hold of your shot?

18:10

They can reach out to me on LinkedIn at Shon Isenhour. You can also reach me right on my cell phone 843-810-4446 or at eruditio.com.

18:21

There are salespeople. And then there are salespeople. He's the ladder. Shon, thank you very much. I appreciate your time. Thank you have a great one. All right, listeners. We're gonna, as you can tell by the the clinking in the background, apparently we're wrapping it up here at the 30 have annual SMRP conference. I'm telling you put this on your calendar. I believe it's in October of next year it is in Orlando, it is a must attend event. Great people like Shon, and maybe we could probably corner him in for another conversation shortly. All right, we're gonna wrap it up. And we're gonna have all his contact information out on industrial talk. So stay tuned, do not go away.

18:59

You're listening to the industrial talk, Podcast Network.

19:04

Great conversation with Shon absolutely wonderful, great venue, by the way, go to SMRP. And it's in Orlando this year. Put that on your calendar. If you're in the asset management, if you're in reliability, if you're you're just trying to manage costs, which you should be, you need to be all engaged with SMRP Great, great community of professionals. SMRP All right. So I go out to Shon stat card. This is just wrapping it up. So I got this stat card. And it's all great. You know, you know that stat card, this is what he does. This is what he does. The best part about that is that yeah, we do education training, and all of them focus on project base, but the best part about it, and I gotta get out there and I didn't even ask about that is that they're located there. We are located aboard the USS Yorktown. How about how about that? This should be on the top priority. You gotta reach out to Shon and Team Eruditio I'm irreducible, just because that's pretty doggone cool. That's off the charts stuff. All right, you have to be about it. You have to be about educating, collaborating, and of course, innovating, because you need to succeed. You need to reach out to people like, like Shon and team introduced to so that you can succeed. It's important stuff. All right, be bold, be brave, daring greatly. Hang out with Shon team. They're the show and you're gonna just change the world. Thank you very much for joining and your supportive industrial talk. We're gonna have another great conversation coming from SMRP shortly so stay tuned.

About the author, Scott

I am Scott MacKenzie, husband, father, and passionate industry educator. From humble beginnings as a lathing contractor and certified journeyman/lineman to an Undergraduate and Master’s Degree in Business Administration, I have applied every aspect of my education and training to lead and influence. I believe in serving and adding value wherever I am called.

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