Stan Schneider with Real-Time Innovations

On this week's Industrial Talk we're talking to Stan Schneider, CEO of Real-Time Innovations (RTI) about “Solutions that enable autonomous success”.  Get the answers to your “Autonomous Innovations” questions along with Stan's unique insight on the “How” on this Industrial Talk interview!

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STAN SCHNEIDER'S CONTACT INFORMATION:

Personal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/stan-schneider-102466/

Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/rti/

Company Website: https://www.rti.com/en/

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PODCAST TRANSCRIPT:

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

people, data, stan, rti, world, industrial, cars, problems, innovation, vehicle, autonomy, technology, collaborate, company, cloud, solution, intelligent, connectivity, run, trusted

00:00

On this episode of industrial talk, we're talking to Stan Schneider Real Time Innovations or RTI, about autonomy, the technology that is needed to encourage and to facilitate autonomy, you need to listen to this podcast. Let's get going.

00:20

Welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So put on your hardhat, grab your work boots, and let's go,

00:38

alright, let the celebration continue on industrial talk. This is where we highlight and celebrate you industrial professionals all around the world. Because you're bold, you're brave, you dare greatly innovate like nobody's business, you're solving problems, you're keenly focused on that. And you're making my life and the lives of many around the world. Yeah, you take that to the bank. As mentioned, we are talking to Stan Schneider, CEO of RTI, and we're going to be talking autonomy. But there's, there's this whole level of innovation that is needed. So let's get cracking.

01:18

Be like it or not, it is here to stay. You better be in the game, you better find your trusted innovation team to give you the give you the lowdown on what is taking place in industry, what is happening in industry, from an innovation and technology perspective, because it is necessary for you to create that business of resilience, that career of resilience. And I can't I mean, the conversations that I have all the time is how do I how do I, as a company, leverage innovation, leverage technology, to help my business, be better in the future, whatever it might be, get greater value out of my assets, whatever that is, that conversation happens all the time. And the only way that I can give you guidance on this is you got to find trusted, advisors trusted, because there's a lot of buzz out there. There's a lot of noise out there on innovation. So Stan, yeah, you can definitely trust that gent, and you can trust the people at RTI. Alright, couple of things, before we get into the conversation that I want you to put on your calendar. All right, we need to get back to normal, right? Whatever that is, whatever that next normal is, let's, let's lean on each other, to be able to do that. Let's have that, you know, that ecosystem of people driving to get back to normal, whatever it might be, I want you to put this event, this wonderful event on your calendar. It is of course, the IoT solutions World Congress, and it is May 10, to the 12th. It's in Barcelona. And I've been very fortunate to be there at a couple of times. And it is a spec tacular event. And it is Chet I mean, you're you're tripping over people who have just mad skills. And it is a great, great venue, to collaborate, to network to get the most and solve problems and find the individuals or find the companies that can definitely answer those questions trusted, right. And that's what we're all about. Now, I'm going to also just sort of just encourage you, you need to be a part of the industrial talk ecosystem. What does that mean, Scott? Well, it is, of course, an entertainment platform, but an industrial entertainment platform that brings out the human side of all of these incredible leaders, industrial leaders. But the best part about it is that you get to collaborate, and you get to connect with people who are just all bent on solving problems, and helping each other achieve whatever success they're trying to achieve. Over the years, I've had a number of conversations as you are well aware. And the conversations always, always, it's never really the technology. It's always the human side. Who can I work with? Who can I collaborate? Who can I trust with? Who can I do? Who can who can who can I? Those are always the questions, always the topic, because everybody, everybody wants their business to succeed their career to succeed, who do I collaborate with, to make sure that that happens? So I'm going to challenge you on these conferences. There's a ton out there, you, man, you go out to this website called 10 times.com 10 times s put an S on that and you'll see All of the events around the world incredible website, by the way, and but the reality is, is that what are we doing? What are we doing to get the most out of these events for your company, for solving problems, and I'm going to just share with you how we approach these conferences outside of the fact that we broadcast Yes, one. And that is just a great way of being able to get the attention that you so desire and deserve, right. So we broadcast live at these events, it's fun, it has nothing short of fun. And then we create this video, and the video is fun. And it highlights all of the wonderful things that are happening at the event and the energy. And it just is a great, great combination. one two punch on how to get that attention to you so deserve but the reality is, is that Gone are the days that we just go to a conference, drank great bourbon and eat great food and and Yuk it up with many people, it could still happen. But I think we have to be far more pinpoint focused on why are we there? How does it impact our bottom line? What is the return on our efforts, right. And so you have to think, think in a way of being able to say, Okay, I'm going to IoT solutions World Congress, there's a pre pre activity, right pre, then there's during, and then there's post, I break it up in those areas, if the pre activity includes I need, I need to schedule schedule, firm connections with my existing customers and my quality or whatever quality connections, I'm going to do that. And that requires a lot of pre work a lot of work upfront. Because when you get to that location, when you get to that site, when you get to the event, you're ready to go, you're ready to roll, you're ready to have that conversation on how your solution, your focus, your, your whatever it is, can help solve problems. And then you fill it up. And then you just keep because the reality is, we could go out to LinkedIn and say, Okay, I'm just going to try to find some quality leads out there. And it's just the cost. But the reality at these events, these events that bring everybody together, they're all there, face to face, human interaction is key, get the most out of it. Okay, so you go to the event, you're on a podcast, you're talking about the subject matter you're talking about, you've already done your pre work, you're out there, now you're, you're doing your stuff right there, you're broadcasting, it's great, you're getting a value added, you know, asset right there. And then. And then the real goal, real rubber is is that you follow up, you nurture, you have to keep at it, you got to you've got to continue to nurture the relationships, listen to what is being said, what are the problems that are being communicated? How does your solution Listen, how your solution could solve problems and be able to have that conversation. But the best part, and the most important part is that you're desperate, you're focused on that individual success, right? It's keenly focused, I want that individual, that company to succeed. To do that, too. You've got to open doors for that customer to it's not only just saying, Hey, we got a great solution. Here it is. It's wonderful. And it could be that right. But I want a relationship. And I know many water relationships that go beyond that. It's like, Hey, I hear what you have to say, I know our solution is good. But I'm destined and focused on your success. And therefore, therefore, I'm going to introduce you to this particular individual. And you make that introduction, you're part of the solution. Talk about Goodwill, talk about the way to collaborate. And I'm telling you right now, trusted individuals, important solutions, innovation important. But the reality is, you don't have all the answers. And that means you need to collaborate. And the more you collaborate, the more you have that conversation, you will succeed. And you'd have to succeed because you're that important. You are, you're just that important. All right. Let's get on with Stan Schneider. So I was very fortunate to be able to interview Stan at IoT solutions World Congress in Barcelona, great guy, and you'll quickly recognize that he's definitely smarter than me. He is. He's got a real sense of honesty, and a desire to truly solve problems. So as we start talking about trusted people, Stan is one of them. And if you're looking and if you're trying to say, okay, autonomy is an important component to my business, and I can't send us data to the cloud, I need something that is right there. So that there's this quick, quick response. Like, let's put it this way. Automobiles. Yes, you need quick response. Stan knows all that. His team RTI knows all that. And I think that you need to reach out Schneider CEO, real time innovations. They just go by RTI. That's the website. So enjoy the conversation with Stan. Stan, welcome to industrial talk. Thank you very much for finding time in your busy schedule to talk to the best. And I mean, the best and the well educated listeners that industry has on industrial talk. How are you doing there, Stan?

10:48

Great.

10:50

The last time we spoke it was in Barcelona. And again, I think I shared with you prior to this conversation that I can't even remember that. I feel like I had hair that that time. Well, it's I'm so glad that you said yes. And you and and the reason we're doing this is one absolutely want to know what's what's happening at RTI, what's happening with standard, what's all of that that's all important. And also, we need to talk about getting our life back in order and whatever that looks like from the IoT solutions World Congress. Before we get all into that, give us a little background, Stan on who you are.

11:26

Hi, I'm Steve Schneider, I run a company called Real Time innovations, RTI, we are a software framework provider for autonomy are the largest in the market by a pretty good margin, we build a software that allows you to put together intelligent distributed systems outside of the cloud. So people think AI is everywhere. It's really not it's mostly in the cloud. And we are trying to enable the real world to be more intelligent by taking smarts and letting them run outside clouds. So

12:03

so I don't have to go to the cloud with your with your solution.

12:07

Now we use things like you know, we call it autonomy. Everybody says you say autonomy, right? Things vehicles, and we are in 250, autonomous vehicle designs of an amazing variety of things. But

12:21

I gotta ask the question, is it really going to happen? Well, will the future just have autonomous vehicles where I could just jump in, get on an autonomous vehicle or my car will be autonomous? Will that ever happen? I mean, really?

12:37

Well, sure, autonomous vehicles are everywhere. Now you probably don't realize that, you know, we started out doing flying things. Lots of autonomous flying things, much easier problem but jumping in his car and dry as soon as you get the, the, you know, bio prejudice out of your head that people are better drivers and computers, you can do that. I started my career crashing cars for a living. So did you really? I did? Yeah. University of Michigan. I was a biomechanics impact.

13:14

Researcher. Yeah, the first one? Just FYI. I don't know, Benny, you're the first one. Congratulations.

13:21

He said I was so I was very excited about that is a long time ago. But you know, back then, we were working on things like, you know, smarter airbags, multistage airbags and Side Impact Protection Systems and crumple zones and crushable steering columns and child seats and wheelchair restraints, and on and on and on. We have all of those things now and more along with you know, stuff like any blood brakes and electronic stability control and any drunk driving laws. And back when I was there, I was all excited because 45,000 people a year in the US were dying in car crashes.

13:58

See, that's pretty cool. We take it for granted out right? We just do. We,

14:03

the sad part is that today, right? I mean, pre pandemic, I suppose there were still 40,009 year kind of crashes. So from a safety perspective, you know, we're driving more miles so it's better per mile. But you know, we couldn't even run tests more than 35 miles an hour. It's just too much energy above that. And I don't believe you can ever make cars safe without fixing the number one safety problem in cars, which is you

14:34

well, maybe pre pandemic but postponed or right now during pandemic I never tried so

14:39

yeah. changed a lot of things but I I do think that you know, at least from a statistical point of view, our task will many locate merit, many environments will be better than non autonomous to go through it soon. And it's a you know, The computers will make mistakes you would never make, you know, they'll they'll, some of the famous ones will mistake a truck for a sign making go under something like that. But you make mistakes that computer and ever make falling asleep and

15:15

driving drunk. And personally, I think it's going to map out,

15:19

you know, everybody, everybody's done that they shouldn't do that. And it's just, yeah, so I do think there will be a time when man in place, you know, it's not going to be everywhere immediately. The autonomous vehicles are coming and they will be safer.

15:37

See, I'm all into it. And and, and I'm, I'm very bullish on it. I think it is definitely going to happen. Yeah, it seems sort of, you know, Logan's Run ish, I guess future. But the reality is, is people smart people like you are making it happen and thinking through it. And it, it just gets better. And so, Michael, my my hope is that all I have to do is jump in I don't have to drive, and I'm safer. And I have to deal with traffic either. I could just sort of sit back and you know, hang out. Alright, let's talk a little bit about IoT. In our conversation prior to this conversation. I thought this was absolutely brilliant. And and listeners agree or disagree. Don't send me a text. I don't want to hear it. IoT. IoT is poorly defined. And I agree with you 100% on that one, because it's, it's like the miscellaneous file, right? Yeah. So I tore through the internet of things. And it's like, things and give us a Why do you say that?

16:42

Well, everything, by definition is a thing. That's very everything. So Internet of Things doesn't really mean much of anything, except that everything has a computer in it. And everything is connected, and awful hard to name anything, they won't have a computer and be connected and just a very few years. 2030 years out there. I mean, computers are increasing in performance and decreasing in costs of this stunning rate. I went to the University of Michigan, I remember going to football games, it'd be a stadium with 100,000 people in it. 100,000 people and you just feel like this little thing, right with this huge press of intelligence around you and humanity. Well, computers increase in performance 100,000 times every 25 years. So when I was a little thing in that stadium, I imagined that entire stadiums available for the computing, I have today, in 25 years from now we'll have 100,000 stadiums, a factor of 10 billion, no more than 10 billion 10 billion in 40 years. So it's it's more than than

17:53

But it's it's even even that timeframe. It's compressing even faster there is there's a philosophy out there. By the way, that's bucket list stuff for me. I want to go up to Ann Arbor, I want to be in that stadium, just just to see it. Because it's it's perfectly shaped. It's like perfect bowl. I like it. Alright. Yeah, I digress.

18:15

10 billion action 50 years, it's just it's, it's hard to understand that it really is the only thing that matters, you're building a system that has to last for the next 3050 years, even 20 years. It really is the only thing you should be thinking as the only factor that matters is how do you take advantage of intelligence, which people don't people don't get today. But I do think the IoT is really pretty much divided into three huge I call them spheres, buckets, whatever you want to call them. There's the device monitoring bucket, which is most of the consumer world in a lot of industrial world to is where you have a device, and it talks to a single cloud service. It may be lots of devices, but it's just, you know, one cloud service since I think like your Nest thermostats or your Fitbits.

19:11

Right here, baby.

19:12

Right, exactly. It's connected to a single cloud service, and it can monitor and control things. In the industrial space, you'll hear about, you know, predictive maintenance and things like that where it's monitoring device. That's one class another class. That's probably the biggest class by the way, good. Sort of the easiest in a lot of ways. The other class is optimization, intelligent optimization, where you sensor eyes, a factory or pipeline and you collect a whole bunch of data and you get it up to the cloud. You think about it. And you use that to optimize the system, typically not very real time. Maybe only optimizer once a month, you're going to change how you manufacture something or what you manufacture based on market or something huge class a lot of the big platforms out

20:04

there, isn't it? Hold it before I forget, isn't there an overlap between the device? And then the Intel optimization? You need a bunch of devices to create that? Intelligent operations? Right?

20:15

Yeah, but it's not I don't know if any strong statement, of course, there's overlap everything, it's everything,

20:22

right? Things

20:25

are things I don't know very many device monitoring things that are also integrated in where they're trying to control and activate devices. That's integrated in with a big data collection AI for more many, many different types of devices. Maybe there are it's I'm sure there are actually take that back. It's not. It's not a huge thing. It's not really my world anyway, my world we live in the edge autonomy world third big sphere, where, instead of having the intelligence in the cloud, the cloud might be a player, but the real intelligence needs to be in the edge in the field, where it's running a car, or a medical robot, or power system, or a defense system, or radar or something, you have to have high performance, high reliability, you could never really count on. I would never, you know, safety research, I would never delegate my safety to anything off vehicle. It's just too many too many failure modes.

21:25

So so the edge as a whole is is there's a there's a speed, right? So I have everything sort of there at the site. Right? If I sent that information to the cloud, there's a there's a latency is that is that the benefit of this?

21:43

That's a benefit. Reliability is probably a bigger benefit. The ability to handle lots of high performance can activities another benefit. You know, you just it depends on the application you're trying to do. But the real, the real benefits to having intelligence there with you as you can make sure it's always available, make sure it's always fast, make sure it's connected in the right way. And we sell connectivity technology that says data centric, and I can explain that if you want.

22:22

Yeah, I do. Because well, you're just, you're just full of interesting jargon, that I have no idea what you're talking,

22:28

right. Well, I mean, I mean, trying to make it as simple as possible. In the intelligence world data is everything, right? So data in the cloud is the reason Facebook and Google have such a good map of you is I got lots of data about you. And you know, data is everything, everybody, everybody sort of gets that today. But in the cloud, you have, you know, to make a model of you at Facebook, I've got these months, years decades, to figure out stuff about you and connectivity between you. If you want to make a data centric model of an intelligent vehicle that's moving, the world changes every millisecond or every several milliseconds anyway. And so you have to, it becomes not about the data itself. What about the data flow, getting the right data to the right place at the right time, right, please might be an AI, or an intelligent algorithm that has to have enough data about its surroundings to make decisions. And those decisions happen have to happen in 20 milliseconds, not 20 weeks. And so it's the same concept as it is the data centric cloud world. It's just now really more about data flow that is about the data itself, you have to get the right data that you

23:54

provide it, can I say that there are different avenues of data. Like sometimes data could go into the cloud, because I don't need it right now. I mean, it's goes up there, it's fine as a, but then there, there's data that has to reside on premise, or in the edge or whatever. So that I, I have the necessity to or have the capability of accessing it, or it delivers insights rapidly. Or there are other avenues like that. Not everyone has to be at the edge.

24:28

No, it's definitely there's always layers. Like there's an architecture called the layer data bus, which is a good example of that where you have a go something inside the vehicle, the car people and people get cars more than other things, even though it's only a small part of the opportunity out there. But you know, cars have Lidar is in radars and Video Intelligence and other kinds of sensors and actuators that has to run and that that environment has a very high speed data flow rate. requirements to get the right information to the right intelligence the right time. So you can make decisions. You know, if you're, if you're not in the car, if you're some control center, something that's monitoring 50,000 cars, you might want to know things that are derived from that car, like where the cars are, how fast they're moving, whether they have people in them or not, whether they have some maintenance problem, if there's somebody stuck, what do you do, if you have an autonomous vehicle, it's stuck in a construction zone, you can't really drive anybody there. But I'm actually on the board of an organization called the tele operations Consortium. Not that I think you can delegate safety to a remote operator, you can certainly delegate getting unstuck, to remote on prayer. And that is another layer of different kinds of data. They don't necessarily need direct access to the LIDAR cloud, but they may well need direct access to the video to see what's going on. And then there's a you know, another layer even above that, where you're going to optimize the use of your vehicles and decide whether you're going to deploy them all to Northeastern Phoenix, or, you know, even take some out of that market, or what kind of vehicles might be more effective, or who pays the most money. And the certain kinds of things you do in the cloud today, which is really becoming more of an optimization tells you an optimization problem. So those things are all mixed together.

26:22

How? Oh, great, this is what you know, you've just started, you tripped a lot happening in that little segment, you trip connectivity, this that do this, but I don't even know where to start and tell you

26:37

where to start. Talk to me. Start with the data, start simple start with the systems do I need out of this system, data is coming out of the LiDAR, what data is coming out of the operators or whatever. And they try to build a system designed around the system as components, like object oriented designs that are really designing around objects, which are almost always mapped to physical things. If you instead just turn it all around, it's a complete, I have a great slide where I show an upside down picture of a lake in the forest look, nice reflection, it looks okay. But there's something wrong. You flip it over and everything sort of changed. If you just think about what data do I have, what data do I need? It's why it's called data centric. You start with a data, and then you can build the components around that data, everything gets very much

27:42

easier to deal with. See, I like that I

27:44

like that much harder than you think to actually do that. But

27:47

yeah, because if I saw a, you know, this big old cauldron of data, right, and swirling around, I even have a hard time figuring out that, is that data? Do I want that one? That what that what does that bring? Right? That requires some skilled eyeballs. It's not my eyeballs, it's somebody else's eyeballs. But to do that, I like the fact that you have the data. And if that data is allows you to be a better, you know, make better decisions, then yeah, you might. And then, then if that's the case, then yeah, okay, let's design something around that. And I guess my

28:24

Go ahead. My favorite architecture diagram has exactly two boxes. It has the application, whatever it is, you're doing, yeah. And then, you know, at almost any level, and then inside that there's another box that says data. And what data Centricity does is logically makes it look like all the data in the entire system, this could be this 50,000, vehicle, cars and all their lidars and all their you know speeds and motor currents or whatever are all logically available, any application that asks for it. With the right call quality of service, like delivery requirements, the security and all that kind of thing. It makes it way easier to write applications, and way easier to do things like make a mobile if the, if the application can just request its data and I need it, you know, maybe I need it with 100 milliseconds delay. That's the latency you're talking about. An ad guy, I know how big it is. And I know all that kind of thing. If I can meet that spec, I can be on the vehicle I can be in some controller on the vehicle, I can be in the cloud, I can have the vehicle drive around and change networks it doesn't matter because my applications only dependent on the data. It just makes it way simpler design. It's a it's a definitely a leap of faith in your thinking as a designer to think about the data first because for most people, it's it's

29:56

and there's there's a lot of companies out there that have been collected data they just have data data, I've got data, and then they they deployed these systems, but they really do not take advantage of that data for point of clarification. Stan, you mentioned it a couple of times for some of the individuals that don't know, can you define LIDAR? What does that mean?

30:18

Lidar is basically Laser Ranging LIDAR shines, a laser usually scans. So think of it doing that. And it's, it's measuring how far away each of those scan points are. So just like your old fashioned CRT monitor would scan the screen and draw a picture, it's doing almost the inverse is scanning an environment and giving you 3d distances, everything in the environment, and they can be pretty fast, and they can be very accurate. But of course, you pay money for both of those features. You can have cheap ones that just do one line basically, will give you some idea.

31:02

But everything else is the price is coming down,

31:05

right? You see him sitting around me, the mechanical ones spinning around on the top of vehicles, those are relatively high end, ones that are may have a lot of ability to get a lot of lines. And they they get a new update every time they spin around. There's some fancier ones that are all solid state that use phased arrays and things like that to change where the where the lasers scanning. It's cheaper, it's not as accurate. Can be faster someday it'll be fast and cheap. Faster, better, cheaper, right, choose any two.

31:39

Yes, but but but it's gonna happen. And I agree with you on that one. It just is because they're smart people like you and others that are that are going to make that happen. And I mean, the future's bold. From my perspective, I wish I was younger, just but you've been doing it for looking at your stack card out there. 17 years, you've been? You've been leading the way for a long time.

32:05

I mean, you've seen the data centric world since Yeah. So yeah, it's been a while. It's a it's an exciting space right now. It just is. We see it everywhere. Yeah. Medical and, you know, we read,

32:25

I'm reading this book, and it talks about technology convergence, I don't have it in front of me. So I'm not going to spout the title of it. But it's, it's that convergence. And then people like you can see other technologies that that are going out there. And you're saying, Hey, I could use that that helped me here and it, and you put it all together, and it just creates a more I don't know a better solution going forward. It's really nice to

32:52

at least sell integration technology. So I'm 100% behind integration is the hard part, I find a bigger blocker out there. And that bigger blockers just flat out confusion.

33:07

And I'm the president of that fan club, because I try. But it's you're right there. There's a lot of confusion out there. But

33:16

we have I mean, there's an alphabet work activity space, there's an alphabet soup kind of activity technologies out there. And everybody, they all use the same kinds of words. They send data, they're latency, they have throughput they have and in reality, they're just completely different. There is different is trains are from tennis shoes. Yes, they're both transportation technologies. You can't interchange them. And so we actually have a we have an online tool if I can login to that comm. And you can answer a bunch of questions. And it'll tell you at least which standards are somewhat appropriate to your world. See, that's cool. We did that originally to stop people from calling us with problems? We can't so.

34:07

So let's create a tool. And yeah, we could solve that. No,

34:10

yeah. Well, we want to talk to the people that will fit, I can ask you five questions and tell you if you're gonna buy our product. And there's simple things like if you said the word millisecond in the last two weeks Do you have more than 10 programmers? They aren't like, you know, give me your design specs. They're just very simple things that you can ask people to find out if you're even in the right Galaxy

34:37

seat. I think that there's a necessity. And I like the simplicity of that approach. I think that there, there tends to be a greater amount of complexity that doesn't need to be there, which then creates greater confusion. So if there's any way of being able to simplify that message, I'm all in because I guarantee you the majority of People? Well, let's put it that way. I'm definitely not a target market. But I like to see what's gonna

35:07

kind of kill you have a nice little online tool, the AIC did a great piece of work called the industrial Connectivity Framework that has all these. It's like 130, dense pages of PDF, I would not expect most people to read but we sort of distill that down in just a few questions that direct people where to go if they're looking at MQ, TT or Kafka or DDS or what say,

35:33

that's a Moscow

35:36

is all automated. And we're not trying to sell anything, we're actually trying to direct people to go to the right way. So we don't deal with the ones that are going the wrong way.

35:46

He mentioned I consortium.org are in industry IoT Consortium. There's a there's a new rebranding out there. And I'm, I'm struggling with the new branding of it. It's in industry IoT Consortium. That's a mouthful, but they got a lot of smart people

36:04

founded or co founded the IoT solutions World Congress.

36:08

Look at you segue again, if this whole RTI thing doesn't work out, you've got a a great and beautiful future in podcasting there, Stan. So tell tell us why. Tell us why IoT solutions? WorldCom.

36:23

That's a disaster.

36:27

Yeah, wow. Very go. Disaster. Don't compete with me. Let me ask why. What? Why is IoT solutions World Congress important to you?

36:38

Um, well, it's been evolving with everything else. This year's plan I love their reorganizing around technology, yes, classes instead of other things they've tried in the past. I think that's really useful. It's, you know, our my company sells into a dozen verticals. So organizing my vertical doesn't help us at all. But we sell a very narrow value proposition, right, we saw only the people answer our five questions. Clearly, way easier if you're going there to get an idea of the components, you know, connectivity and security. And they're, they're all almost obviously somewhat related. You can't have conductivity without security, for instance. Yeah. But it's so much easier to understand the thing and remember, the number one blocker out there is confusion. If you've divided it up into the server component, technologies, people get it better that way. And there's companies like, you know, we have a security solution to but we we will be in the conductivity section, because that's really we have security that works with our kind of that kind of activity that they don't sell a security solution. We just have one that goes with our stuff, which is more common.

38:03

Yeah. See, it's interesting, and you bring up a good point there. One, there are companies out there that are reluctant to true, you know, we do we make our things this way, this is how we have been doing it forever. And that's, that says sort of legacy mindset. And that's fine. I believe that if you are a company that has a desire to be successful in the future, your journey, your strategy, your strategic thinking has to include all of this, this wonderful innovation such as what RTI does, the other area that I think is necessary, if you say that is a fact that is a reality, it got to participate. Then events like IoT solutions, World Congress, and the people that go there is a great resource to start learning and begin your journey. And to find trusted people like Stan. How's that? Did I did I nail it, Stan?

39:05

Yes, pretty good. For you, you know,

39:09

hey, my big game today their stamp be game now my game?

39:14

Definitely. You know, in general, most people go to things like this to understand the world. Confusion is the biggest blocker. The confused mind says no. And, you know, it's a big risk. I mean, our average customers probably spending a couple 100 million dollars building this new intelligent system. And obviously some of them you know, the famous ones like the Eevee autonomous vehicle, they just vehicle design, spending multiple billions of dollars in a decade and to go into that without understanding what's going on is, you know, is not going to happen. So it's it's a good thing. least to go and see how others work and some people are afraid it's all vendors. Well, vendors know what they're doing. I hate to say it, but we've we failed. We've got 2000 applications out there. We failed hundreds of times in that right. And we've learned a lot and we definitely have some ways to help people think about their problems. It's different.

40:23

All right, we got to wrap it up. How does somebody get a hold of Stan and RTI and why that's important outside of the fact that if you're contemplating this, I think you need to at least go to it's rti.com.

40:34

Right. rti.com Easiest URL there is out there

40:38

I can remember it

40:42

will tell you a whole story around now. Um, yeah. Glen, RJ comm you can learn all about the company. You want to connect with me the best place on LinkedIn, just go to LinkedIn for stationery. There's a lot of standard nighters in the world, unfortunately, but yeah. Close to the space.

41:00

Yeah. So you asked that listeners go to Stan Snyder. Put a little comment there, RTI. You'll see it go t greenery, Ana's header, quote, yeah, that that's the Stan, reach

41:18

30 unique LinkedIn page is all a bunch of stories. So yeah, if you like stories, you can go there and read about why we did the company. And that's cool. See why I left my, my Stanford

41:32

academic careers is getting ready. I said, you got a little PhD at Stanford.

41:37

Yeah, a PhD from Stanford. And I left I left academia because essentially, I figured out 95% of academicians are working on problems that simply don't exist. Which I mean, that's not a dig at research, because after 5% changes the world, but if you're in research, you got about a 95% chance of doing nothing useful.

42:02

That's a whole other conversation that would frustrate the hell out of me.

42:06

Yeah, it's it's frustrating in a company. If you do nothing useful. You fail and you get to go do something else. Yeah. Nursing, you can claim you're leaving for decades. And next thing not being having any followers. That's a

42:21

whole nother conversation. It's like digging a ditch and filling it back in.

42:27

To get me in trouble with my academic track against it at all. It's just it's a tough game. Yeah.

42:35

It is. Running a company to be fair, but to be fair, I agree with you. 100%. I've been there done that. And, yes. Don't Don't be squiffy about running a company. You've got to. That's a that's a whole nother conversation.

42:53

You say the word slipping.

42:54

I could say squiffy. You want to put it out on a bumper sticker. You could say squeaky No, no, no, no, no, no, it's it's good now. You get you get it's like, squiffy today, I can't believe it. I got that from a movie. I can't remember where but they are. So I'm squiffy. Wow, is it

43:22

yeah hard working fast paced enthusiastic person who works in a restaurant or bar

43:32

Stan, thank you very much for being on industrial talk and saying yes to something today. squiffy run away have a good time on that one. All right. Thank you, Stan for being here. Great. All right. They're not

43:51

I do end up traveling anywhere. Let me know. I'll hang out with you.

43:56

Yeah, let's see. Hi, beer factor with Stan. You want to hang out with him? You want to have a beer with your factor. Hi. All right. We're gonna wrap it up on the other side. Do not go away. We will be right back.

44:09

You're listening to the industrial talk Podcast Network.

44:18

All right, that Stan? Absolutely incredible conversation, Team RTI. They are focused on your success and you definitely could trust them. Reach out, go out to Stan Schneider's stat card out on LinkedIn reach out and connect. You're not going to be disappointed. All right, again. Let's get to this next normal, whatever it is, that means go into these events IoT solutions World Congress may 10 through the 12th go out to their website, find out more. Again, that is a great a great event to put on your calendar. Because they're all They're just laying it be apart. Be a part of the industrial talk ecosystem. We're just focused on entertainment. Bringing out that human element, and definitely solving problems and being able to collaborate with a bunch of people from around the world. You need to be a part of it. It's easy. Go to industrial talk.com Find out more. So a lot of fun, be bold, be brave, Daring Greatly hang out with people who are bold, brave and daring. Greatly like Stan. You're gonna change the world. We're gonna have another great conversation.

Transcript

00:00

On this episode of industrial talk, we're talking to Stan Schneider Real Time Innovations or RTI, about autonomy, the technology that is needed to encourage and to facilitate autonomy, you need to listen to this podcast. Let's get going.

00:20

Welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So put on your hardhat, grab your work boots, and let's go,

00:38

alright, let the celebration continue on industrial talk. This is where we highlight and celebrate you industrial professionals all around the world. Because you're bold, you're brave, you dare greatly innovate like nobody's business, you're solving problems, you're keenly focused on that. And you're making my life and the lives of many around the world. Yeah, you take that to the bank. As mentioned, we are talking to Stan Schneider, CEO of RTI, and we're going to be talking autonomy. But there's, there's this whole level of innovation that is needed. So let's get cracking.

01:18

Be like it or not, it is here to stay. You better be in the game, you better find your trusted innovation team to give you the give you the lowdown on what is taking place in industry, what is happening in industry, from an innovation and technology perspective, because it is necessary for you to create that business of resilience, that career of resilience. And I can't I mean, the conversations that I have all the time is how do I how do I, as a company, leverage innovation, leverage technology, to help my business, be better in the future, whatever it might be, get greater value out of my assets, whatever that is, that conversation happens all the time. And the only way that I can give you guidance on this is you got to find trusted, advisors trusted, because there's a lot of buzz out there. There's a lot of noise out there on innovation. So Stan, yeah, you can definitely trust that gent, and you can trust the people at RTI. Alright, couple of things, before we get into the conversation that I want you to put on your calendar. All right, we need to get back to normal, right? Whatever that is, whatever that next normal is, let's, let's lean on each other, to be able to do that. Let's have that, you know, that ecosystem of people driving to get back to normal, whatever it might be, I want you to put this event, this wonderful event on your calendar. It is of course, the IoT solutions World Congress, and it is May 10, to the 12th. It's in Barcelona. And I've been very fortunate to be there at a couple of times. And it is a spec tacular event. And it is Chet I mean, you're you're tripping over people who have just mad skills. And it is a great, great venue, to collaborate, to network to get the most and solve problems and find the individuals or find the companies that can definitely answer those questions trusted, right. And that's what we're all about. Now, I'm going to also just sort of just encourage you, you need to be a part of the industrial talk ecosystem. What does that mean, Scott? Well, it is, of course, an entertainment platform, but an industrial entertainment platform that brings out the human side of all of these incredible leaders, industrial leaders. But the best part about it is that you get to collaborate, and you get to connect with people who are just all bent on solving problems, and helping each other achieve whatever success they're trying to achieve. Over the years, I've had a number of conversations as you are well aware. And the conversations always, always, it's never really the technology. It's always the human side. Who can I work with? Who can I collaborate? Who can I trust with? Who can I do? Who can who can who can I? Those are always the questions, always the topic, because everybody, everybody wants their business to succeed their career to succeed, who do I collaborate with, to make sure that that happens? So I'm going to challenge you on these conferences. There's a ton out there, you, man, you go out to this website called 10 times.com 10 times s put an S on that and you'll see All of the events around the world incredible website, by the way, and but the reality is, is that what are we doing? What are we doing to get the most out of these events for your company, for solving problems, and I'm going to just share with you how we approach these conferences outside of the fact that we broadcast Yes, one. And that is just a great way of being able to get the attention that you so desire and deserve, right. So we broadcast live at these events, it's fun, it has nothing short of fun. And then we create this video, and the video is fun. And it highlights all of the wonderful things that are happening at the event and the energy. And it just is a great, great combination. one two punch on how to get that attention to you so deserve but the reality is, is that Gone are the days that we just go to a conference, drank great bourbon and eat great food and and Yuk it up with many people, it could still happen. But I think we have to be far more pinpoint focused on why are we there? How does it impact our bottom line? What is the return on our efforts, right. And so you have to think, think in a way of being able to say, Okay, I'm going to IoT solutions World Congress, there's a pre pre activity, right pre, then there's during, and then there's post, I break it up in those areas, if the pre activity includes I need, I need to schedule schedule, firm connections with my existing customers and my quality or whatever quality connections, I'm going to do that. And that requires a lot of pre work a lot of work upfront. Because when you get to that location, when you get to that site, when you get to the event, you're ready to go, you're ready to roll, you're ready to have that conversation on how your solution, your focus, your, your whatever it is, can help solve problems. And then you fill it up. And then you just keep because the reality is, we could go out to LinkedIn and say, Okay, I'm just going to try to find some quality leads out there. And it's just the cost. But the reality at these events, these events that bring everybody together, they're all there, face to face, human interaction is key, get the most out of it. Okay, so you go to the event, you're on a podcast, you're talking about the subject matter you're talking about, you've already done your pre work, you're out there, now you're, you're doing your stuff right there, you're broadcasting, it's great, you're getting a value added, you know, asset right there. And then. And then the real goal, real rubber is is that you follow up, you nurture, you have to keep at it, you got to you've got to continue to nurture the relationships, listen to what is being said, what are the problems that are being communicated? How does your solution Listen, how your solution could solve problems and be able to have that conversation. But the best part, and the most important part is that you're desperate, you're focused on that individual success, right? It's keenly focused, I want that individual, that company to succeed. To do that, too. You've got to open doors for that customer to it's not only just saying, Hey, we got a great solution. Here it is. It's wonderful. And it could be that right. But I want a relationship. And I know many water relationships that go beyond that. It's like, Hey, I hear what you have to say, I know our solution is good. But I'm destined and focused on your success. And therefore, therefore, I'm going to introduce you to this particular individual. And you make that introduction, you're part of the solution. Talk about Goodwill, talk about the way to collaborate. And I'm telling you right now, trusted individuals, important solutions, innovation important. But the reality is, you don't have all the answers. And that means you need to collaborate. And the more you collaborate, the more you have that conversation, you will succeed. And you'd have to succeed because you're that important. You are, you're just that important. All right. Let's get on with Stan Schneider. So I was very fortunate to be able to interview Stan at IoT solutions World Congress in Barcelona, great guy, and you'll quickly recognize that he's definitely smarter than me. He is. He's got a real sense of honesty, and a desire to truly solve problems. So as we start talking about trusted people, Stan is one of them. And if you're looking and if you're trying to say, okay, autonomy is an important component to my business, and I can't send us data to the cloud, I need something that is right there. So that there's this quick, quick response. Like, let's put it this way. Automobiles. Yes, you need quick response. Stan knows all that. His team RTI knows all that. And I think that you need to reach out Schneider CEO, real time innovations. They just go by RTI. That's the website. So enjoy the conversation with Stan. Stan, welcome to industrial talk. Thank you very much for finding time in your busy schedule to talk to the best. And I mean, the best and the well educated listeners that industry has on industrial talk. How are you doing there, Stan?

10:48

Great.

10:50

The last time we spoke it was in Barcelona. And again, I think I shared with you prior to this conversation that I can't even remember that. I feel like I had hair that that time. Well, it's I'm so glad that you said yes. And you and and the reason we're doing this is one absolutely want to know what's what's happening at RTI, what's happening with standard, what's all of that that's all important. And also, we need to talk about getting our life back in order and whatever that looks like from the IoT solutions World Congress. Before we get all into that, give us a little background, Stan on who you are.

11:26

Hi, I'm Steve Schneider, I run a company called Real Time innovations, RTI, we are a software framework provider for autonomy are the largest in the market by a pretty good margin, we build a software that allows you to put together intelligent distributed systems outside of the cloud. So people think AI is everywhere. It's really not it's mostly in the cloud. And we are trying to enable the real world to be more intelligent by taking smarts and letting them run outside clouds. So

12:03

so I don't have to go to the cloud with your with your solution.

12:07

Now we use things like you know, we call it autonomy. Everybody says you say autonomy, right? Things vehicles, and we are in 250, autonomous vehicle designs of an amazing variety of things. But

12:21

I gotta ask the question, is it really going to happen? Well, will the future just have autonomous vehicles where I could just jump in, get on an autonomous vehicle or my car will be autonomous? Will that ever happen? I mean, really?

12:37

Well, sure, autonomous vehicles are everywhere. Now you probably don't realize that, you know, we started out doing flying things. Lots of autonomous flying things, much easier problem but jumping in his car and dry as soon as you get the, the, you know, bio prejudice out of your head that people are better drivers and computers, you can do that. I started my career crashing cars for a living. So did you really? I did? Yeah. University of Michigan. I was a biomechanics impact.

13:14

Researcher. Yeah, the first one? Just FYI. I don't know, Benny, you're the first one. Congratulations.

13:21

He said I was so I was very excited about that is a long time ago. But you know, back then, we were working on things like, you know, smarter airbags, multistage airbags and Side Impact Protection Systems and crumple zones and crushable steering columns and child seats and wheelchair restraints, and on and on and on. We have all of those things now and more along with you know, stuff like any blood brakes and electronic stability control and any drunk driving laws. And back when I was there, I was all excited because 45,000 people a year in the US were dying in car crashes.

13:58

See, that's pretty cool. We take it for granted out right? We just do. We,

14:03

the sad part is that today, right? I mean, pre pandemic, I suppose there were still 40,009 year kind of crashes. So from a safety perspective, you know, we're driving more miles so it's better per mile. But you know, we couldn't even run tests more than 35 miles an hour. It's just too much energy above that. And I don't believe you can ever make cars safe without fixing the number one safety problem in cars, which is you

14:34

well, maybe pre pandemic but postponed or right now during pandemic I never tried so

14:39

yeah. changed a lot of things but I I do think that you know, at least from a statistical point of view, our task will many locate merit, many environments will be better than non autonomous to go through it soon. And it's a you know, The computers will make mistakes you would never make, you know, they'll they'll, some of the famous ones will mistake a truck for a sign making go under something like that. But you make mistakes that computer and ever make falling asleep and

15:15

driving drunk. And personally, I think it's going to map out,

15:19

you know, everybody, everybody's done that they shouldn't do that. And it's just, yeah, so I do think there will be a time when man in place, you know, it's not going to be everywhere immediately. The autonomous vehicles are coming and they will be safer.

15:37

See, I'm all into it. And and, and I'm, I'm very bullish on it. I think it is definitely going to happen. Yeah, it seems sort of, you know, Logan's Run ish, I guess future. But the reality is, is people smart people like you are making it happen and thinking through it. And it, it just gets better. And so, Michael, my my hope is that all I have to do is jump in I don't have to drive, and I'm safer. And I have to deal with traffic either. I could just sort of sit back and you know, hang out. Alright, let's talk a little bit about IoT. In our conversation prior to this conversation. I thought this was absolutely brilliant. And and listeners agree or disagree. Don't send me a text. I don't want to hear it. IoT. IoT is poorly defined. And I agree with you 100% on that one, because it's, it's like the miscellaneous file, right? Yeah. So I tore through the internet of things. And it's like, things and give us a Why do you say that?

16:42

ed and just a very few years.:

17:53

But it's it's even even that timeframe. It's compressing even faster there is there's a philosophy out there. By the way, that's bucket list stuff for me. I want to go up to Ann Arbor, I want to be in that stadium, just just to see it. Because it's it's perfectly shaped. It's like perfect bowl. I like it. Alright. Yeah, I digress.

18:15

that has to last for the next:

19:11

Right here, baby.

19:12

Right, exactly. It's connected to a single cloud service, and it can monitor and control things. In the industrial space, you'll hear about, you know, predictive maintenance and things like that where it's monitoring device. That's one class another class. That's probably the biggest class by the way, good. Sort of the easiest in a lot of ways. The other class is optimization, intelligent optimization, where you sensor eyes, a factory or pipeline and you collect a whole bunch of data and you get it up to the cloud. You think about it. And you use that to optimize the system, typically not very real time. Maybe only optimizer once a month, you're going to change how you manufacture something or what you manufacture based on market or something huge class a lot of the big platforms out

20:04

there, isn't it? Hold it before I forget, isn't there an overlap between the device? And then the Intel optimization? You need a bunch of devices to create that? Intelligent operations? Right?

20:15

Yeah, but it's not I don't know if any strong statement, of course, there's overlap everything, it's everything,

20:22

right? Things

20:25

are things I don't know very many device monitoring things that are also integrated in where they're trying to control and activate devices. That's integrated in with a big data collection AI for more many, many different types of devices. Maybe there are it's I'm sure there are actually take that back. It's not. It's not a huge thing. It's not really my world anyway, my world we live in the edge autonomy world third big sphere, where, instead of having the intelligence in the cloud, the cloud might be a player, but the real intelligence needs to be in the edge in the field, where it's running a car, or a medical robot, or power system, or a defense system, or radar or something, you have to have high performance, high reliability, you could never really count on. I would never, you know, safety research, I would never delegate my safety to anything off vehicle. It's just too many too many failure modes.

21:25

So so the edge as a whole is is there's a there's a speed, right? So I have everything sort of there at the site. Right? If I sent that information to the cloud, there's a there's a latency is that is that the benefit of this?

21:43

That's a benefit. Reliability is probably a bigger benefit. The ability to handle lots of high performance can activities another benefit. You know, you just it depends on the application you're trying to do. But the real, the real benefits to having intelligence there with you as you can make sure it's always available, make sure it's always fast, make sure it's connected in the right way. And we sell connectivity technology that says data centric, and I can explain that if you want.

22:22

Yeah, I do. Because well, you're just, you're just full of interesting jargon, that I have no idea what you're talking,

22:28

right. Well, I mean, I mean, trying to make it as simple as possible. In the intelligence world data is everything, right? So data in the cloud is the reason Facebook and Google have such a good map of you is I got lots of data about you. And you know, data is everything, everybody, everybody sort of gets that today. But in the cloud, you have, you know, to make a model of you at Facebook, I've got these months, years decades, to figure out stuff about you and connectivity between you. If you want to make a data centric model of an intelligent vehicle that's moving, the world changes every millisecond or every several milliseconds anyway. And so you have to, it becomes not about the data itself. What about the data flow, getting the right data to the right place at the right time, right, please might be an AI, or an intelligent algorithm that has to have enough data about its surroundings to make decisions. And those decisions happen have to happen in 20 milliseconds, not 20 weeks. And so it's the same concept as it is the data centric cloud world. It's just now really more about data flow that is about the data itself, you have to get the right data that you

23:54

provide it, can I say that there are different avenues of data. Like sometimes data could go into the cloud, because I don't need it right now. I mean, it's goes up there, it's fine as a, but then there, there's data that has to reside on premise, or in the edge or whatever. So that I, I have the necessity to or have the capability of accessing it, or it delivers insights rapidly. Or there are other avenues like that. Not everyone has to be at the edge.

24:28

No, it's definitely there's always layers. Like there's an architecture called the layer data bus, which is a good example of that where you have a go something inside the vehicle, the car people and people get cars more than other things, even though it's only a small part of the opportunity out there. But you know, cars have Lidar is in radars and Video Intelligence and other kinds of sensors and actuators that has to run and that that environment has a very high speed data flow rate. requirements to get the right information to the right intelligence the right time. So you can make decisions. You know, if you're, if you're not in the car, if you're some control center, something that's monitoring 50,000 cars, you might want to know things that are derived from that car, like where the cars are, how fast they're moving, whether they have people in them or not, whether they have some maintenance problem, if there's somebody stuck, what do you do, if you have an autonomous vehicle, it's stuck in a construction zone, you can't really drive anybody there. But I'm actually on the board of an organization called the tele operations Consortium. Not that I think you can delegate safety to a remote operator, you can certainly delegate getting unstuck, to remote on prayer. And that is another layer of different kinds of data. They don't necessarily need direct access to the LIDAR cloud, but they may well need direct access to the video to see what's going on. And then there's a you know, another layer even above that, where you're going to optimize the use of your vehicles and decide whether you're going to deploy them all to Northeastern Phoenix, or, you know, even take some out of that market, or what kind of vehicles might be more effective, or who pays the most money. And the certain kinds of things you do in the cloud today, which is really becoming more of an optimization tells you an optimization problem. So those things are all mixed together.

26:22

How? Oh, great, this is what you know, you've just started, you tripped a lot happening in that little segment, you trip connectivity, this that do this, but I don't even know where to start and tell you

26:37

where to start. Talk to me. Start with the data, start simple start with the systems do I need out of this system, data is coming out of the LiDAR, what data is coming out of the operators or whatever. And they try to build a system designed around the system as components, like object oriented designs that are really designing around objects, which are almost always mapped to physical things. If you instead just turn it all around, it's a complete, I have a great slide where I show an upside down picture of a lake in the forest look, nice reflection, it looks okay. But there's something wrong. You flip it over and everything sort of changed. If you just think about what data do I have, what data do I need? It's why it's called data centric. You start with a data, and then you can build the components around that data, everything gets very much

27:42

easier to deal with. See, I like that I

27:44

like that much harder than you think to actually do that. But

27:47

yeah, because if I saw a, you know, this big old cauldron of data, right, and swirling around, I even have a hard time figuring out that, is that data? Do I want that one? That what that what does that bring? Right? That requires some skilled eyeballs. It's not my eyeballs, it's somebody else's eyeballs. But to do that, I like the fact that you have the data. And if that data is allows you to be a better, you know, make better decisions, then yeah, you might. And then, then if that's the case, then yeah, okay, let's design something around that. And I guess my

28:24

Go ahead. My favorite architecture diagram has exactly two boxes. It has the application, whatever it is, you're doing, yeah. And then, you know, at almost any level, and then inside that there's another box that says data. And what data Centricity does is logically makes it look like all the data in the entire system, this could be this 50,000, vehicle, cars and all their lidars and all their you know speeds and motor currents or whatever are all logically available, any application that asks for it. With the right call quality of service, like delivery requirements, the security and all that kind of thing. It makes it way easier to write applications, and way easier to do things like make a mobile if the, if the application can just request its data and I need it, you know, maybe I need it with 100 milliseconds delay. That's the latency you're talking about. An ad guy, I know how big it is. And I know all that kind of thing. If I can meet that spec, I can be on the vehicle I can be in some controller on the vehicle, I can be in the cloud, I can have the vehicle drive around and change networks it doesn't matter because my applications only dependent on the data. It just makes it way simpler design. It's a it's a definitely a leap of faith in your thinking as a designer to think about the data first because for most people, it's it's

29:56

and there's there's a lot of companies out there that have been collected data they just have data data, I've got data, and then they they deployed these systems, but they really do not take advantage of that data for point of clarification. Stan, you mentioned it a couple of times for some of the individuals that don't know, can you define LIDAR? What does that mean?

30:18

Lidar is basically Laser Ranging LIDAR shines, a laser usually scans. So think of it doing that. And it's, it's measuring how far away each of those scan points are. So just like your old fashioned CRT monitor would scan the screen and draw a picture, it's doing almost the inverse is scanning an environment and giving you 3d distances, everything in the environment, and they can be pretty fast, and they can be very accurate. But of course, you pay money for both of those features. You can have cheap ones that just do one line basically, will give you some idea.

31:02

But everything else is the price is coming down,

31:05

right? You see him sitting around me, the mechanical ones spinning around on the top of vehicles, those are relatively high end, ones that are may have a lot of ability to get a lot of lines. And they they get a new update every time they spin around. There's some fancier ones that are all solid state that use phased arrays and things like that to change where the where the lasers scanning. It's cheaper, it's not as accurate. Can be faster someday it'll be fast and cheap. Faster, better, cheaper, right, choose any two.

31:39

Yes, but but but it's gonna happen. And I agree with you on that one. It just is because they're smart people like you and others that are that are going to make that happen. And I mean, the future's bold. From my perspective, I wish I was younger, just but you've been doing it for looking at your stack card out there. 17 years, you've been? You've been leading the way for a long time.

32:05

I mean, you've seen the data centric world since Yeah. So yeah, it's been a while. It's a it's an exciting space right now. It just is. We see it everywhere. Yeah. Medical and, you know, we read,

32:25

I'm reading this book, and it talks about technology convergence, I don't have it in front of me. So I'm not going to spout the title of it. But it's, it's that convergence. And then people like you can see other technologies that that are going out there. And you're saying, Hey, I could use that that helped me here and it, and you put it all together, and it just creates a more I don't know a better solution going forward. It's really nice to

32:52

at least sell integration technology. So I'm 100% behind integration is the hard part, I find a bigger blocker out there. And that bigger blockers just flat out confusion.

33:07

And I'm the president of that fan club, because I try. But it's you're right there. There's a lot of confusion out there. But

33:16

we have I mean, there's an alphabet work activity space, there's an alphabet soup kind of activity technologies out there. And everybody, they all use the same kinds of words. They send data, they're latency, they have throughput they have and in reality, they're just completely different. There is different is trains are from tennis shoes. Yes, they're both transportation technologies. You can't interchange them. And so we actually have a we have an online tool if I can login to that comm. And you can answer a bunch of questions. And it'll tell you at least which standards are somewhat appropriate to your world. See, that's cool. We did that originally to stop people from calling us with problems? We can't so.

34:07

So let's create a tool. And yeah, we could solve that. No,

34:10

yeah. Well, we want to talk to the people that will fit, I can ask you five questions and tell you if you're gonna buy our product. And there's simple things like if you said the word millisecond in the last two weeks Do you have more than 10 programmers? They aren't like, you know, give me your design specs. They're just very simple things that you can ask people to find out if you're even in the right Galaxy

34:37

seat. I think that there's a necessity. And I like the simplicity of that approach. I think that there, there tends to be a greater amount of complexity that doesn't need to be there, which then creates greater confusion. So if there's any way of being able to simplify that message, I'm all in because I guarantee you the majority of People? Well, let's put it that way. I'm definitely not a target market. But I like to see what's gonna

35:07

kind of kill you have a nice little online tool, the AIC did a great piece of work called the industrial Connectivity Framework that has all these. It's like 130, dense pages of PDF, I would not expect most people to read but we sort of distill that down in just a few questions that direct people where to go if they're looking at MQ, TT or Kafka or DDS or what say,

35:33

that's a Moscow

35:36

is all automated. And we're not trying to sell anything, we're actually trying to direct people to go to the right way. So we don't deal with the ones that are going the wrong way.

35:46

He mentioned I consortium.org are in industry IoT Consortium. There's a there's a new rebranding out there. And I'm, I'm struggling with the new branding of it. It's in industry IoT Consortium. That's a mouthful, but they got a lot of smart people

36:04

founded or co founded the IoT solutions World Congress.

36:08

Look at you segue again, if this whole RTI thing doesn't work out, you've got a a great and beautiful future in podcasting there, Stan. So tell tell us why. Tell us why IoT solutions? WorldCom.

36:23

That's a disaster.

36:27

Yeah, wow. Very go. Disaster. Don't compete with me. Let me ask why. What? Why is IoT solutions World Congress important to you?

36:38

Um, well, it's been evolving with everything else. This year's plan I love their reorganizing around technology, yes, classes instead of other things they've tried in the past. I think that's really useful. It's, you know, our my company sells into a dozen verticals. So organizing my vertical doesn't help us at all. But we sell a very narrow value proposition, right, we saw only the people answer our five questions. Clearly, way easier if you're going there to get an idea of the components, you know, connectivity and security. And they're, they're all almost obviously somewhat related. You can't have conductivity without security, for instance. Yeah. But it's so much easier to understand the thing and remember, the number one blocker out there is confusion. If you've divided it up into the server component, technologies, people get it better that way. And there's companies like, you know, we have a security solution to but we we will be in the conductivity section, because that's really we have security that works with our kind of that kind of activity that they don't sell a security solution. We just have one that goes with our stuff, which is more common.

38:03

Yeah. See, it's interesting, and you bring up a good point there. One, there are companies out there that are reluctant to true, you know, we do we make our things this way, this is how we have been doing it forever. And that's, that says sort of legacy mindset. And that's fine. I believe that if you are a company that has a desire to be successful in the future, your journey, your strategy, your strategic thinking has to include all of this, this wonderful innovation such as what RTI does, the other area that I think is necessary, if you say that is a fact that is a reality, it got to participate. Then events like IoT solutions, World Congress, and the people that go there is a great resource to start learning and begin your journey. And to find trusted people like Stan. How's that? Did I did I nail it, Stan?

39:05

Yes, pretty good. For you, you know,

39:09

hey, my big game today their stamp be game now my game?

39:14

ut we've we failed. We've got:

40:23

All right, we got to wrap it up. How does somebody get a hold of Stan and RTI and why that's important outside of the fact that if you're contemplating this, I think you need to at least go to it's rti.com.

40:34

Right. rti.com Easiest URL there is out there

40:38

I can remember it

40:42

will tell you a whole story around now. Um, yeah. Glen, RJ comm you can learn all about the company. You want to connect with me the best place on LinkedIn, just go to LinkedIn for stationery. There's a lot of standard nighters in the world, unfortunately, but yeah. Close to the space.

41:00

Yeah. So you asked that listeners go to Stan Snyder. Put a little comment there, RTI. You'll see it go t greenery, Ana's header, quote, yeah, that that's the Stan, reach

41:18

30 unique LinkedIn page is all a bunch of stories. So yeah, if you like stories, you can go there and read about why we did the company. And that's cool. See why I left my, my Stanford

41:32

academic careers is getting ready. I said, you got a little PhD at Stanford.

41:37

Yeah, a PhD from Stanford. And I left I left academia because essentially, I figured out 95% of academicians are working on problems that simply don't exist. Which I mean, that's not a dig at research, because after 5% changes the world, but if you're in research, you got about a 95% chance of doing nothing useful.

42:02

That's a whole other conversation that would frustrate the hell out of me.

42:06

Yeah, it's it's frustrating in a company. If you do nothing useful. You fail and you get to go do something else. Yeah. Nursing, you can claim you're leaving for decades. And next thing not being having any followers. That's a

42:21

whole nother conversation. It's like digging a ditch and filling it back in.

42:27

To get me in trouble with my academic track against it at all. It's just it's a tough game. Yeah.

42:35

It is. Running a company to be fair, but to be fair, I agree with you. 100%. I've been there done that. And, yes. Don't Don't be squiffy about running a company. You've got to. That's a that's a whole nother conversation.

42:53

You say the word slipping.

42:54

I could say squiffy. You want to put it out on a bumper sticker. You could say squeaky No, no, no, no, no, no, it's it's good now. You get you get it's like, squiffy today, I can't believe it. I got that from a movie. I can't remember where but they are. So I'm squiffy. Wow, is it

43:22

yeah hard working fast paced enthusiastic person who works in a restaurant or bar

43:32

Stan, thank you very much for being on industrial talk and saying yes to something today. squiffy run away have a good time on that one. All right. Thank you, Stan for being here. Great. All right. They're not

43:51

I do end up traveling anywhere. Let me know. I'll hang out with you.

43:56

Yeah, let's see. Hi, beer factor with Stan. You want to hang out with him? You want to have a beer with your factor. Hi. All right. We're gonna wrap it up on the other side. Do not go away. We will be right back.

44:09

You're listening to the industrial talk Podcast Network.

44:18

All right, that Stan? Absolutely incredible conversation, Team RTI. They are focused on your success and you definitely could trust them. Reach out, go out to Stan Schneider's stat card out on LinkedIn reach out and connect. You're not going to be disappointed. All right, again. Let's get to this next normal, whatever it is, that means go into these events IoT solutions World Congress may 10 through the 12th go out to their website, find out more. Again, that is a great a great event to put on your calendar. Because they're all They're just laying it be apart. Be a part of the industrial talk ecosystem. We're just focused on entertainment. Bringing out that human element, and definitely solving problems and being able to collaborate with a bunch of people from around the world. You need to be a part of it. It's easy. Go to industrial talk.com Find out more. So a lot of fun, be bold, be brave, Daring Greatly hang out with people who are bold, brave and daring. Greatly like Stan. You're gonna change the world. We're gonna have another great conversation.

About the author, Scott

I am Scott MacKenzie, husband, father, and passionate industry educator. From humble beginnings as a lathing contractor and certified journeyman/lineman to an Undergraduate and Master’s Degree in Business Administration, I have applied every aspect of my education and training to lead and influence. I believe in serving and adding value wherever I am called.

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