Brent Duersch with EY and Nottingham Spirk

On this week's Industrial Talk we're talking to Brent Duersch, Managing Director with EY and Nottingham Spirk about “Wave Space and Delivering Innovation to Solve Real Challenges”.  Get the answers to your “Innovation” questions along with Brent's unique insight on the “How” on this Industrial Talk interview!

Finally, get your exclusive free access to the Industrial Academy and a series on “Why You Need To Podcast” for Greater Success in 2022. All links designed for keeping you current in this rapidly changing Industrial Market. Learn! Grow! Enjoy!

BRENT DUERSCH'S CONTACT INFORMATION:

Personal LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bduersch/

Company LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/ernstandyoung/

Company Website: https://www.ey.com/en_gl

PODCAST VIDEO:

THE STRATEGIC REASON “WHY YOU NEED TO PODCAST”:

OTHER GREAT INDUSTRIAL RESOURCES:

NEOMhttps://www.neom.com/en-us

Hitachi Vantara: https://www.hitachivantara.com/en-us/home.html

Industrial Marketing Solutions:  https://industrialtalk.com/industrial-marketing/

Industrial Academy: https://industrialtalk.com/industrial-academy/

Industrial Dojo: https://industrialtalk.com/industrial_dojo/

We the 15: https://www.wethe15.org/

YOUR INDUSTRIAL DIGITAL TOOLBOX:

LifterLMS: Get One Month Free for $1 – https://lifterlms.com/

Active Campaign: Active Campaign Link

Social Jukebox: https://www.socialjukebox.com/

Industrial Academy (One Month Free Access And One Free License For Future Industrial Leader):

Business Beatitude the Book

Do you desire a more joy-filled, deeply-enduring sense of accomplishment and success? Live your business the way you want to live with the BUSINESS BEATITUDES…The Bridge connecting sacrifice to success. YOU NEED THE BUSINESS BEATITUDES!

TAP INTO YOUR INDUSTRIAL SOUL, RESERVE YOUR COPY NOW! BE BOLD. BE BRAVE. DARE GREATLY AND CHANGE THE WORLD. GET THE BUSINESS BEATITUDES!

Reserve My Copy and My 25% Discount

PODCAST TRANSCRIPT:

SUMMARY KEYWORDS

nottingham, product, innovation, ey, talk, bentonville, people, cleveland, space, wave, problems, brent, collaborate, world, create, workshops, work, innovation hub, hub, real

00:00

On this episode of industrial talk, we are broadcasting live. Yes, live from Nottingham spark in Cleveland, Ohio. I'm telling you, you got to put that location on your bucket list for a visit. incredible innovation out there. We're talking to Brett with Ernst and Young. So let's get cracking

00:22

Welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So good on your hard hat, grab your work boots, and let's

00:39

write once again, welcome to industrial talk. This is a platform that celebrates you industrial heroes all around the world and the universe. I don't think I'm overselling that. We celebrate you because you are bold. You are brave. You dare greatly. You're changing lives and you are changing the world each and every day. Why not celebrate you? Because you aren't that spectacular. Alright. In the hot seat. We have a gentleman by the name of Brent, how do you say your last name again? Oh, it's dirt. Jewish. You know, it's right because I have to. He's, he's my sidekick for this particular conversation. We're going to be talking. First is Young's wave space here at Nottingham. Seberg. And you say to yourself, Scott, I don't know Matt Nottingham, sir. You need to know Nottingham. Sperg. Okay, let's get cracking. Brad, how you doing?

01:27

Hey, I'm doing great today.

01:28

Do you ever pinch yourself because you work here, this Nottingham square he just sort of pinch yourself.

01:33

I just wake up in the morning. And I'm like, I cannot believe this space. Yes, I know. I have that same discussion with my wife every morning. Or like, every day when I get home. I'm like, You know what? I get paid to do this. This is the best. This is the best job ever.

01:51

And I have to say, you know you do you do you go to the store and say yep, yeah, uh huh. Oh, yep. And then your wife says, I'm tired of having this conversation. Oh, yeah,

02:00

I know. I know. I did that the other day, walking up and down the aisles. And I was like, just like, Hey, I recognize that mouthwash bottle. Right. And, you know, I'm getting that that, like, pick up the bread. It's like, does it matter? No, no, this is the coolest mouthwash bottle ever. Like let me tell you about how it works. Right?

02:19

Don't bring me to a party. Alright, for the listeners out there. Give us a little background on who Brent is.

02:25

Yeah, sure. So so I'm with Ernst and Young. I'm

02:29

okay. How do we how do we simplify? Can I just say Ian,

02:33

why how you can just say EY you don't

02:36

have to ampersand in there. Yeah. Okay. Ey.

02:39

Yes. So yes, I'm with you. I'm a managing director here at the the EY Nottingham spark innovation hub has been with the firm for basically two months now. So so new. Yep. New to the firm. Yeah, to Cleveland, just, you know, new new to all things here. But, but basically my background, I grew up in Cincinnati. So this is the the homecoming to Ohio here. spent 20 years at Procter and Gamble, did some product innovation work for them and a fair amount of emerging technology work. So over the course of 20 years, you can imagine what's emerging technology at one point gets pretty mundane and boring later, right. So I've seen a little bit everything come and go over the years. And then really was us ready for something new from a personal and professional standpoint. And my wife and I packed it up. We moved out to Bentonville, Arkansas, and a few years working with Walmart. So

03:34

So, oh, what's the population of Bentonville?

03:37

You know, it's it's a Bentonville proper. I think it's about 25 30,000 but the metro area. I mean, if you take all of the towns Rogers Fayetteville where the university is, I mean, it's creeping up to I think that the the latest census numbers it was up over 100,000 There you go. Yeah. Okay.

03:58

I just never, never knew it. Yeah,

04:01

no, it's a it's a big area. It's a growing area. It's an interesting area because a lot of people move there and don't want to leave because the food scene is great art scene is great outdoor scene wherever know that you wouldn't have guessed. Oh, but it's, it's a fantasy. It's a fantastic place to live. So,

04:19

okay, do your bucket list. I'm gonna put that on. Bentonville

04:22

go to Bentonville? You know, it's not Cleveland. Cool, but it's, it's cool.

04:26

Yes. It's not Cleveland. Cool. Because it's cool here. And it's cool.

04:32

I know. But we got the best. I mean, think about this is mid November in Cleveland and we're sitting out on a patio it's 60 degrees.

04:41

Yeah, and if you're if you're looking at the video that the trees are beautiful it come on. See, I'm looking at that. Check that out. It's picturesque looks great. Look at that. Yeah, that's fantastic. And you're not and we're here, right? Fire in front of us.

04:56

Yeah, go not bad at all. But yeah, so but yeah, like I said, Just a couple months ago, moved back to Cleveland started with EY. And you know, basically I'm in residence here at the, the Innovation Hub, you know, five days a week, and it's it's the it's the coolest place

05:13

to hitch me. Yeah, I was all geeky. When I come walking through and I see the big dome. I'm going oh my gosh, that's big. It's big.

05:23

Oh, yeah, man. It's, it's, it's I get to work simultaneously in a temple and a garage. Like,

05:30

this is like a concert. It's sort of funny, because it's like, this is Quonset hut. Like, but it's, it's got mad tech everywhere.

05:37

It does. Oh, yeah, absolutely.

05:40

You got to put this on. Alright, let's talk a little bit about that. Now. Ey is here. You've got that relationship with Nottingham spark or an S. And you see the the necessity this is this is important that we start to develop these innovations. And and you're walking around and you're looking at all the innovations. Why is it important for EY to be here.

06:03

So it's, I think there's a couple different pieces one, UI has a lot of experience in creating digital solutions. And if you look at the evolution of product, and particularly, you know, the the evolution of trying to put services, to wrap services around products, you have the ability to to create a connected product, right, embed the right sensors in it, get the data off the sensors make sense of the data coming off of those sensors, that's really important these days, is a is a manufacturer who really, really wants to understand what the customer experience is, that really wants to understand what's going on out in the field. You know, connected connected products really is a you know, a key area to invest in. So the partnership between Nottingham Seberg, who has a just an amazing track record,

06:58

the stat card is stupid, good. Oh, I

07:01

know. Yeah. 1313 150, some tap 190 5%

07:04

all commercial, it's like, yeah, got it. Yeah, you're hitting home runs every time you step up to the plate,

07:11

I mean, just just crazy numbers. Right. But But, but part of that is it comes from, you know, a very disciplined, you know, innovation processes, vertical innovation, right. And, and being extremely customer centric, right. And it really, really understanding what the what the consumer wants, what the shopper wants. So So you you take that expertise, right, and how to create a product. That's that's just that, you know, the word, the word that I want to use is irresistible. Right? That yeah, customers can't wait to buy that, that shoppers can't wait to purchase. And you combine that with some of the with the digital know how of v y to say not only how can we can we, you know, embed sensors, embed connectivity in that project product, connect it, to collect data off of it, use that data to improve the product and the customer experience? But even like, how could we create? How could we manufacture that product? Right, taking advantage of the latest tech, you know, the latest advanced manufacturing technology we have to offer? It makes for a great a great partnership, because our I think our capabilities mesh very well. So it's in talking

08:27

to John and I and and he's been there celebrating 50 years. Yeah, phenomenal success, great. But then there's this infusion of this digital world, into their, their world, and they're able to say, oh my gosh, we can take, you know, our past and digitize, we can do it. And it just never stops.

08:49

No, there's no end to it. And that's what makes it exciting, right is is the, the amount of value you can get by by taking a project or a product and adding some sort of a digital component. Right. Yeah, I mean, first of all, it's like if it if it doesn't create value for the customer, right? It's gone. But that's, that's part of the beauty here. That's part of the story here. Right? Is that that the products that are getting created here do delight customers and consumers clearly right? There's no doubt there. But but but but being able to add that digital layer, right that to get the sensors to be able to put the data to use to create a, you know, some sort of an app experience, right? Um, can you I like to say it's a multiplier effect on the value that that a product can deliver. And so I think there's a there's massive amounts of potential here.

09:47

So here's my goal. You can take this before John and team. Refrigerator I want some I want some, I want some digital transformation. stuff on my refrigerator that notifies that maintenance person to come fix my refrigerator before it fails. That's what I want. On the consumer,

10:10

this is totally doable. totally doable, is if you think about some of the some of the products we've seen today, right? And and, you know, what's possible with being able to get alerts off of machines and of how they're, they're really, really performing. Right and and to apply artificial intelligence or machine learning to it to start to predict when it's going to break. This is entirely possible. This is not, you know, this is not the stuff of dreams anymore. It's pretty cool. Yeah. So it's like, it's like, there's no reason we can't do that with your fridge. Right? There's probably no reason we can't get your fridge to, you know, automatically replenish what you're taking

10:50

my AC every part. I don't want to have to think about and wake up and say, am I refrigerators warm? What is going on? And I don't want to have that conversation. I want to have that thinking I want it to happen naturally. It's

11:02

like it. Yeah, it's just saying the ideal state, you know, products products never break or they never surprise you when you when they break.

11:09

That's That's exactly right. Okay, so I'm wandering around. This is a great place it is Disney Land. That is real. Right? So I'm wandering around and I'm in this converted garage. And all I see out there is this this term wave space? Oh, yes. What is that

11:26

sockless? Yeah, sure. So, so wave space is a wise platform for for collaboration and the the ideas that we bring, not only individual clients, but groups of client clients together, really try to understand the the problems, the issues, the challenges that they're facing, and then guide them through a journey, you know, basically a facilitated journey of what looks like help, what looks like a, you know, a solution and really engage in that, that co creation co design process together. So, so wave space experience, right should not be about, you know, come here, and we're going to show, you know, like, lock you in a room and show you like, 1000s of consulting PowerPoints, right? It's, it's, we're gonna have a dialogue. Thank

12:14

you. Yeah,

12:15

thank you. Yeah, there will be no, there will be no slides with Chevron's here today. Right. So but that's part of his, like, let's, let's put together an experience that's really centered on the on the client and the problems they face and the opportunities that are ahead of them and, and work together on on how we can can solve those problems and bring it to life.

12:36

See, it's interesting, because I look up there and and and if you have a touchscreen, whatever computer, think of it 300 times larger and it's it's it's almost What's that? What's the there's a show out there that it's it's a Minority Report ish? Oh, yes. Yeah, I guarantee I'm gonna come back here five years, and it's gonna be what? They're actually doing it with air?

13:02

No, I, I hesitate to say this now. But some of the technology we have here was actually invented by the guys behind Minority Report there. Yeah, this is not You're not, you're not stretching the truth at all right. But to have a, you know, to to one of the things that was interesting during the past year and a half the past two years during the pandemic is it used to be you'd get people together for ideation sessions and workshops, and it was like, let's all we all gather around the marker board, right, and we'll get out 1000, post it notes, and we'll sketch and we'll draw, and we'll put the post it notes up and move them around and cluster them and group them and so on. And that process worked really well, when everybody is in person, right? But during the past year and a half, when you can't be in person, how do you maintain that same kind of experience in in a world where not everyone is is physically, you know, co located. So one of the beauties of waste space is having the right mix of the technology like the right physical technology in the space, like the big screens, the touch screens, right in the supporting software allows us to do ideation and sketching and concept development in a way that regardless of where people physically are, whether they're in in this wave space, whether in their in one of Eli's other 50 Wave spaces, because we got 50 other of these kinds of facilities around the world. Right, or whether they're, you know, frankly, sitting at home in front of their laptop, right, it levels the playing field and everyone can can have an equal, you know, a much more equal contribution to, you know, to helping to define the problem helping to solve the problems.

14:51

See what I do see is that that it's, it's intuitive, but it's still sort of sticking note ish and and With that sticky notice approach that collaborative feeling, okay, that I mean, there's a really a lot of benefits. But I think I like the fact that you can have these, these sort of breakout sessions, right? And then start bringing all the thinking together. Because the old way is somebody has to pull down the sticky notes. And oh, yeah, alright. You're the lucky one that gets to try to collaborate, pull all this together and make sense out of all these sticky notes. That's not a good job.

15:32

I don't know how many. I don't know how many years that was my job. That's what I'm thinking through in the back of my mind. Like, you know, that that was my thing. I

15:41

go, Brent.

15:42

Yeah, I remember, remember going to Beijing or going to Caracas to fill facil facilitate different types of workshops and sessions, right. And you get done. And it's like, you're loading piles of post it notes into your your suitcase to check and thinking like, wow, I really hope these don't get lost on the way back, right. Like, you know, someone customs is gonna open up your suitcase and be looking at it saying, like, why are you smuggling like, 4000? post it notes into the country? I was like, Well, you know,

16:13

that's what I do. You know, yeah, I smuggle post it notes. But it's

16:17

great to not have to worry about that. Right. It's like when we do sessions here, it's like, everything's captured electronically. It's, it's basically immediately available for share out.

16:27

See, and this is what's interesting. If that's the case, then the the energy that has been created through that collaborative activity is not lost, because you know, as well as I do after that number is like, yeah, man, we're running. They run on out and they go grab a bite to eat or something like that. And that's gone.

16:44

Yeah, the worst, the worst thing that happens, right, it's the valley of death that comes after a really a really great workshop, right? You bring people together, everyone gets the, you know, get some inspiration gets exposed to some some different stimuli. Right? And then you spend all day ideating. Right? It's, you know, at the end of the day, it's, you know, everybody puts their hands in, okay, now, Bray, right. And what you don't want is it to turn into the, you know, the five day void of like, okay, well, we all got together and talk about this stuff. Now. What do we do, right, but by the time you get the summary of the workshop, everyone forgot what you did. It's exactly correct.

17:21

But here, we're having some workshops at this particular moment. We've got people, they're talking about it, they're putting it up there, and they're going to see the real sort of the results of this activity. Today,

17:35

here. Yeah. And it's like the breakouts that we've got going on today. We're talking about it, what's, what are the issues around talent and workforce that that manufacturers are facing now? What's on what's on everybody's digital transformation and innovation agendas? I know, I'm throwing the buzzwords

17:55

don't worry about it, I got it, man. I can handle it. Bring them on.

17:58

But this is real. Right. So because we're in these breakouts, right. And, and, and everyone sort of sort of, you know, working through the these themes together. And and yeah, as the day closes, right, we'll we'll look across, you know, it'll be interesting to look across all of the groups, we haven't seen where the common themes, all right,

18:16

I gotta tell you, it's gonna be it's gonna be interesting. And for once, to use a sports analogy, this, this particular product waves Facebook, by the way, can I get a wave space?

18:26

You want a wave space?

18:27

I do. Everybody wants a wave space? Well, that's not an answer that I want my wave space anyway, they're gonna move the ball forward, you're going to take this energy of these people who are, they've got their own life, they've, they're doing their own thing, but you're going to be able to capture it, communicate it, and really prioritize what's impacting, in this particular case, Northeast Ohio. Now from a manufacturing perspective.

18:51

Absolutely, absolutely. And, you know, a big part of this is, you know, one make it real, right? We're talking about real, you know, real issues, like, even in the past two weeks. Yeah. Since the hub, open, the number of discussions I've had with with, you know, people passing through it around, like, the labor shortage, right, and how do we deal with getting the right talent to work in our plants and work in our facilities? Right, it's, it's, it's real, that's on everyone's minds, right. So so, you know, at least being able to get local leaders, business leaders together and have a real discussion and share ideas around, you know, what's what's working for you? What's working for you? It's, it's,

19:31

it's great. See, so, you know, we've talked about the bad stuff that's happened with the pandemic, okay, got it. No, and I got to talk about it. But the one thing that is really sort of positive is you brought up a good point, there is this need to collaborate, what's working for you what's working for, and being able to share that in a in a way that that can be received and help solve problems that people are dealing with? And so, I like that. I think that that's a powerful Positive than any we got something like this product that we're talking about here this wave space, right? I just I just love the fact that you are moving forward, you're providing solutions providing insights

20:11

when and you to me, you know, cool. Yeah, part of the success for today, right is if we close out today's session, right one of one of the things I always, you know, want to hear is when participants show, you know, stand up, and they say, this was today was a great start. And we want to figure out how to continue this dialogue. And that's, that's pretty cool. Yeah, it's a great thing. It's like, let's get everybody in the room. Get everyone talking. Make the connections. Yes, folks go home. Come back. Again. It's like, let's pick up where we left off.

20:43

So somebody's listening out there. I'm a manufacturer, I want to talk to Brent, how do I get a hold of you.

20:49

So check out he wired.com/innovation. Hub, and got a website, reach out to us there gladly talk to you about what we do at the hub, talk to you about the wave space experience all day long.

21:02

I'm telling you right now, if you're not engaged, if you're a manufacturer, and you're not engaged in this particular digital transformation is solving problems from a customer's perspective. You need to jump on the train. It is traveling fast, and you need to be a part of this conversation. Remember to educate, collaborate and innovate. That's what I'm all about. That's what this innovation, this hub is all about that education, collaboration. Definitely innovation. Be a part of it. Thank you very much, Brent, that was an incredible conversation. Absolutely. I'm castled.

21:34

That's why That's why we're here to dazzle you. Of course, I'm

21:38

easily dazzled because well, I always geek out on this stuff. Alright, listeners, we're gonna wrap it up on the other side. So fear not, we're gonna have it all. After this break. So stay tuned.

21:49

You're listening to the industrial talk Podcast Network.

21:59

I cannot express the gratitude, I had to be able to broadcast from Nottingham spur, and Ey, that whole location is just dripping with solutions to problems. It is an innovation hub that you if you're in manufacturing, if you're just in industry as a whole. You need to make that a part of your pilgrimage. If you go up to Cleveland, I'm telling you, man, I was dazzled. And well, I'm easily dazzled. But man that is like, that is 10 hard hat dazzle baby. I'm telling you right now, make it a point. All right. Remember, you need to be bold, brave and daring greatly. You need to collaborate, you need to innovate. And if you want to succeed if you want to be able to create that business of resilience, you need to interact with people like Brent EY, trusted individuals that can help you with that journey. Make it so because we need you out there. All right. We're going to have another great conversation right around the corner. So stay tuned.

Transcript

00:00

On this episode of industrial talk, we are broadcasting live. Yes, live from Nottingham spark in Cleveland, Ohio. I'm telling you, you got to put that location on your bucket list for a visit. incredible innovation out there. We're talking to Brett with Ernst and Young. So let's get cracking

00:22

Welcome to the industrial talk podcast with Scott Mackenzie. Scott is a passionate industry professional dedicated to transferring cutting edge industry focused innovations and trends while highlighting the men and women who keep the world moving. So good on your hard hat, grab your work boots, and let's

00:39

write once again, welcome to industrial talk. This is a platform that celebrates you industrial heroes all around the world and the universe. I don't think I'm overselling that. We celebrate you because you are bold. You are brave. You dare greatly. You're changing lives and you are changing the world each and every day. Why not celebrate you? Because you aren't that spectacular. Alright. In the hot seat. We have a gentleman by the name of Brent, how do you say your last name again? Oh, it's dirt. Jewish. You know, it's right because I have to. He's, he's my sidekick for this particular conversation. We're going to be talking. First is Young's wave space here at Nottingham. Seberg. And you say to yourself, Scott, I don't know Matt Nottingham, sir. You need to know Nottingham. Sperg. Okay, let's get cracking. Brad, how you doing?

01:27

Hey, I'm doing great today.

01:28

Do you ever pinch yourself because you work here, this Nottingham square he just sort of pinch yourself.

01:33

I just wake up in the morning. And I'm like, I cannot believe this space. Yes, I know. I have that same discussion with my wife every morning. Or like, every day when I get home. I'm like, You know what? I get paid to do this. This is the best. This is the best job ever.

01:51

And I have to say, you know you do you do you go to the store and say yep, yeah, uh huh. Oh, yep. And then your wife says, I'm tired of having this conversation. Oh, yeah,

02:00

I know. I know. I did that the other day, walking up and down the aisles. And I was like, just like, Hey, I recognize that mouthwash bottle. Right. And, you know, I'm getting that that, like, pick up the bread. It's like, does it matter? No, no, this is the coolest mouthwash bottle ever. Like let me tell you about how it works. Right?

02:19

Don't bring me to a party. Alright, for the listeners out there. Give us a little background on who Brent is.

02:25

Yeah, sure. So so I'm with Ernst and Young. I'm

02:29

okay. How do we how do we simplify? Can I just say Ian,

02:33

why how you can just say EY you don't

02:36

have to ampersand in there. Yeah. Okay. Ey.

02:39

Yes. So yes, I'm with you. I'm a managing director here at the the EY Nottingham spark innovation hub has been with the firm for basically two months now. So so new. Yep. New to the firm. Yeah, to Cleveland, just, you know, new new to all things here. But, but basically my background, I grew up in Cincinnati. So this is the the homecoming to Ohio here. spent 20 years at Procter and Gamble, did some product innovation work for them and a fair amount of emerging technology work. So over the course of 20 years, you can imagine what's emerging technology at one point gets pretty mundane and boring later, right. So I've seen a little bit everything come and go over the years. And then really was us ready for something new from a personal and professional standpoint. And my wife and I packed it up. We moved out to Bentonville, Arkansas, and a few years working with Walmart. So

03:34

So, oh, what's the population of Bentonville?

03:37

You know, it's it's a Bentonville proper. I think it's about 25 30,000 but the metro area. I mean, if you take all of the towns Rogers Fayetteville where the university is, I mean, it's creeping up to I think that the the latest census numbers it was up over 100,000 There you go. Yeah. Okay.

03:58

I just never, never knew it. Yeah,

04:01

no, it's a it's a big area. It's a growing area. It's an interesting area because a lot of people move there and don't want to leave because the food scene is great art scene is great outdoor scene wherever know that you wouldn't have guessed. Oh, but it's, it's a fantasy. It's a fantastic place to live. So,

04:19

okay, do your bucket list. I'm gonna put that on. Bentonville

04:22

go to Bentonville? You know, it's not Cleveland. Cool, but it's, it's cool.

04:26

Yes. It's not Cleveland. Cool. Because it's cool here. And it's cool.

04:32

I know. But we got the best. I mean, think about this is mid November in Cleveland and we're sitting out on a patio it's 60 degrees.

04:41

Yeah, and if you're if you're looking at the video that the trees are beautiful it come on. See, I'm looking at that. Check that out. It's picturesque looks great. Look at that. Yeah, that's fantastic. And you're not and we're here, right? Fire in front of us.

04:56

Yeah, go not bad at all. But yeah, so but yeah, like I said, Just a couple months ago, moved back to Cleveland started with EY. And you know, basically I'm in residence here at the, the Innovation Hub, you know, five days a week, and it's it's the it's the coolest place

05:13

to hitch me. Yeah, I was all geeky. When I come walking through and I see the big dome. I'm going oh my gosh, that's big. It's big.

05:23

Oh, yeah, man. It's, it's, it's I get to work simultaneously in a temple and a garage. Like,

05:30

this is like a concert. It's sort of funny, because it's like, this is Quonset hut. Like, but it's, it's got mad tech everywhere.

05:37

It does. Oh, yeah, absolutely.

05:40

You got to put this on. Alright, let's talk a little bit about that. Now. Ey is here. You've got that relationship with Nottingham spark or an S. And you see the the necessity this is this is important that we start to develop these innovations. And and you're walking around and you're looking at all the innovations. Why is it important for EY to be here.

06:03

So it's, I think there's a couple different pieces one, UI has a lot of experience in creating digital solutions. And if you look at the evolution of product, and particularly, you know, the the evolution of trying to put services, to wrap services around products, you have the ability to to create a connected product, right, embed the right sensors in it, get the data off the sensors make sense of the data coming off of those sensors, that's really important these days, is a is a manufacturer who really, really wants to understand what the customer experience is, that really wants to understand what's going on out in the field. You know, connected connected products really is a you know, a key area to invest in. So the partnership between Nottingham Seberg, who has a just an amazing track record,

06:58

the stat card is stupid, good. Oh, I

07:01

know. Yeah.:

07:04

all commercial, it's like, yeah, got it. Yeah, you're hitting home runs every time you step up to the plate,

07:11

I mean, just just crazy numbers. Right. But But, but part of that is it comes from, you know, a very disciplined, you know, innovation processes, vertical innovation, right. And, and being extremely customer centric, right. And it really, really understanding what the what the consumer wants, what the shopper wants. So So you you take that expertise, right, and how to create a product. That's that's just that, you know, the word, the word that I want to use is irresistible. Right? That yeah, customers can't wait to buy that, that shoppers can't wait to purchase. And you combine that with some of the with the digital know how of v y to say not only how can we can we, you know, embed sensors, embed connectivity in that project product, connect it, to collect data off of it, use that data to improve the product and the customer experience? But even like, how could we create? How could we manufacture that product? Right, taking advantage of the latest tech, you know, the latest advanced manufacturing technology we have to offer? It makes for a great a great partnership, because our I think our capabilities mesh very well. So it's in talking

08:27

to John and I and and he's been there celebrating 50 years. Yeah, phenomenal success, great. But then there's this infusion of this digital world, into their, their world, and they're able to say, oh my gosh, we can take, you know, our past and digitize, we can do it. And it just never stops.

08:49

No, there's no end to it. And that's what makes it exciting, right is is the, the amount of value you can get by by taking a project or a product and adding some sort of a digital component. Right. Yeah, I mean, first of all, it's like if it if it doesn't create value for the customer, right? It's gone. But that's, that's part of the beauty here. That's part of the story here. Right? Is that that the products that are getting created here do delight customers and consumers clearly right? There's no doubt there. But but but but being able to add that digital layer, right that to get the sensors to be able to put the data to use to create a, you know, some sort of an app experience, right? Um, can you I like to say it's a multiplier effect on the value that that a product can deliver. And so I think there's a there's massive amounts of potential here.

09:47

So here's my goal. You can take this before John and team. Refrigerator I want some I want some, I want some digital transformation. stuff on my refrigerator that notifies that maintenance person to come fix my refrigerator before it fails. That's what I want. On the consumer,

10:10

this is totally doable. totally doable, is if you think about some of the some of the products we've seen today, right? And and, you know, what's possible with being able to get alerts off of machines and of how they're, they're really, really performing. Right and and to apply artificial intelligence or machine learning to it to start to predict when it's going to break. This is entirely possible. This is not, you know, this is not the stuff of dreams anymore. It's pretty cool. Yeah. So it's like, it's like, there's no reason we can't do that with your fridge. Right? There's probably no reason we can't get your fridge to, you know, automatically replenish what you're taking

10:50

my AC every part. I don't want to have to think about and wake up and say, am I refrigerators warm? What is going on? And I don't want to have that conversation. I want to have that thinking I want it to happen naturally. It's

11:02

like it. Yeah, it's just saying the ideal state, you know, products products never break or they never surprise you when you when they break.

11:09

That's That's exactly right. Okay, so I'm wandering around. This is a great place it is Disney Land. That is real. Right? So I'm wandering around and I'm in this converted garage. And all I see out there is this this term wave space? Oh, yes. What is that

11:26

in a room and show you like,:

12:14

you. Yeah,

12:15

thank you. Yeah, there will be no, there will be no slides with Chevron's here today. Right. So but that's part of his, like, let's, let's put together an experience that's really centered on the on the client and the problems they face and the opportunities that are ahead of them and, and work together on on how we can can solve those problems and bring it to life.

12:36

See, it's interesting, because I look up there and and and if you have a touchscreen, whatever computer, think of it 300 times larger and it's it's it's almost What's that? What's the there's a show out there that it's it's a Minority Report ish? Oh, yes. Yeah, I guarantee I'm gonna come back here five years, and it's gonna be what? They're actually doing it with air?

13:02

ard, right, and we'll get out:

14:51

See what I do see is that that it's, it's intuitive, but it's still sort of sticking note ish and and With that sticky notice approach that collaborative feeling, okay, that I mean, there's a really a lot of benefits. But I think I like the fact that you can have these, these sort of breakout sessions, right? And then start bringing all the thinking together. Because the old way is somebody has to pull down the sticky notes. And oh, yeah, alright. You're the lucky one that gets to try to collaborate, pull all this together and make sense out of all these sticky notes. That's not a good job.

15:32

I don't know how many. I don't know how many years that was my job. That's what I'm thinking through in the back of my mind. Like, you know, that that was my thing. I

15:41

go, Brent.

15:42

, why are you smuggling like,:

16:13

that's what I do. You know, yeah, I smuggle post it notes. But it's

16:17

great to not have to worry about that. Right. It's like when we do sessions here, it's like, everything's captured electronically. It's, it's basically immediately available for share out.

16:27

See, and this is what's interesting. If that's the case, then the the energy that has been created through that collaborative activity is not lost, because you know, as well as I do after that number is like, yeah, man, we're running. They run on out and they go grab a bite to eat or something like that. And that's gone.

16:44

Yeah, the worst, the worst thing that happens, right, it's the valley of death that comes after a really a really great workshop, right? You bring people together, everyone gets the, you know, get some inspiration gets exposed to some some different stimuli. Right? And then you spend all day ideating. Right? It's, you know, at the end of the day, it's, you know, everybody puts their hands in, okay, now, Bray, right. And what you don't want is it to turn into the, you know, the five day void of like, okay, well, we all got together and talk about this stuff. Now. What do we do, right, but by the time you get the summary of the workshop, everyone forgot what you did. It's exactly correct.

17:21

But here, we're having some workshops at this particular moment. We've got people, they're talking about it, they're putting it up there, and they're going to see the real sort of the results of this activity. Today,

17:35

here. Yeah. And it's like the breakouts that we've got going on today. We're talking about it, what's, what are the issues around talent and workforce that that manufacturers are facing now? What's on what's on everybody's digital transformation and innovation agendas? I know, I'm throwing the buzzwords

17:55

don't worry about it, I got it, man. I can handle it. Bring them on.

17:58

But this is real. Right. So because we're in these breakouts, right. And, and, and everyone sort of sort of, you know, working through the these themes together. And and yeah, as the day closes, right, we'll we'll look across, you know, it'll be interesting to look across all of the groups, we haven't seen where the common themes, all right,

18:16

I gotta tell you, it's gonna be it's gonna be interesting. And for once, to use a sports analogy, this, this particular product waves Facebook, by the way, can I get a wave space?

18:26

You want a wave space?

18:27

I do. Everybody wants a wave space? Well, that's not an answer that I want my wave space anyway, they're gonna move the ball forward, you're going to take this energy of these people who are, they've got their own life, they've, they're doing their own thing, but you're going to be able to capture it, communicate it, and really prioritize what's impacting, in this particular case, Northeast Ohio. Now from a manufacturing perspective.

18:51

Absolutely, absolutely. And, you know, a big part of this is, you know, one make it real, right? We're talking about real, you know, real issues, like, even in the past two weeks. Yeah. Since the hub, open, the number of discussions I've had with with, you know, people passing through it around, like, the labor shortage, right, and how do we deal with getting the right talent to work in our plants and work in our facilities? Right, it's, it's, it's real, that's on everyone's minds, right. So so, you know, at least being able to get local leaders, business leaders together and have a real discussion and share ideas around, you know, what's what's working for you? What's working for you? It's, it's,

19:31

it's great. See, so, you know, we've talked about the bad stuff that's happened with the pandemic, okay, got it. No, and I got to talk about it. But the one thing that is really sort of positive is you brought up a good point, there is this need to collaborate, what's working for you what's working for, and being able to share that in a in a way that that can be received and help solve problems that people are dealing with? And so, I like that. I think that that's a powerful Positive than any we got something like this product that we're talking about here this wave space, right? I just I just love the fact that you are moving forward, you're providing solutions providing insights

20:11

when and you to me, you know, cool. Yeah, part of the success for today, right is if we close out today's session, right one of one of the things I always, you know, want to hear is when participants show, you know, stand up, and they say, this was today was a great start. And we want to figure out how to continue this dialogue. And that's, that's pretty cool. Yeah, it's a great thing. It's like, let's get everybody in the room. Get everyone talking. Make the connections. Yes, folks go home. Come back. Again. It's like, let's pick up where we left off.

20:43

So somebody's listening out there. I'm a manufacturer, I want to talk to Brent, how do I get a hold of you.

20:49

So check out he wired.com/innovation. Hub, and got a website, reach out to us there gladly talk to you about what we do at the hub, talk to you about the wave space experience all day long.

21:02

I'm telling you right now, if you're not engaged, if you're a manufacturer, and you're not engaged in this particular digital transformation is solving problems from a customer's perspective. You need to jump on the train. It is traveling fast, and you need to be a part of this conversation. Remember to educate, collaborate and innovate. That's what I'm all about. That's what this innovation, this hub is all about that education, collaboration. Definitely innovation. Be a part of it. Thank you very much, Brent, that was an incredible conversation. Absolutely. I'm castled.

21:34

That's why That's why we're here to dazzle you. Of course, I'm

21:38

easily dazzled because well, I always geek out on this stuff. Alright, listeners, we're gonna wrap it up on the other side. So fear not, we're gonna have it all. After this break. So stay tuned.

21:49

You're listening to the industrial talk Podcast Network.

21:59

I cannot express the gratitude, I had to be able to broadcast from Nottingham spur, and Ey, that whole location is just dripping with solutions to problems. It is an innovation hub that you if you're in manufacturing, if you're just in industry as a whole. You need to make that a part of your pilgrimage. If you go up to Cleveland, I'm telling you, man, I was dazzled. And well, I'm easily dazzled. But man that is like, that is 10 hard hat dazzle baby. I'm telling you right now, make it a point. All right. Remember, you need to be bold, brave and daring greatly. You need to collaborate, you need to innovate. And if you want to succeed if you want to be able to create that business of resilience, you need to interact with people like Brent EY, trusted individuals that can help you with that journey. Make it so because we need you out there. All right. We're going to have another great conversation right around the corner. So stay tuned.

About the author, Scott

I am Scott MacKenzie, husband, father, and passionate industry educator. From humble beginnings as a lathing contractor and certified journeyman/lineman to an Undergraduate and Master’s Degree in Business Administration, I have applied every aspect of my education and training to lead and influence. I believe in serving and adding value wherever I am called.

Leave a Comment





This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.